06/14/14

How To Bitcoin Multi Signature Address -Wallet

multi-sig-01gAtO ThInK – Multi-Sig will help Bitcoins, but it’s all about the blockchain since it is the one that keeps the Multi-sig Address and the release of the funds by 2 of the 3 signing of the escrow transaction and recording it in the blockchain and it get’s confirmed by the miners like all good Bitcoin transactions so try and give the miners a little fee in any transactions.

Multi-Sig TX

Multi-Sig TX

BUT it’s kinda complicated and most wallets do not support Multi-Sig. The few that do allow Multi-Sig almost require you to be a programmer of sort to even generate the Multi-Sig Address yet alone spend your money once you have them in the wallet.

  1. - First thing is to generate the Multi-sig Wallet address: 
  2. - Register the wallet in the blockchain by sending some money to this address to verify it is working.   
  3. - To get you money out of a Multi-Sig address you need to: signrawtransaction
  4. - We have to get 2 of the 3 to sign the transaction and submit it to the blockchain. – Of course 1 ? 2 – or 3 privateKeys too authorize the transaction. Depending on how you set it up in the first place.   
    • RedeemScript
    • TXid
    • ScriptPubKey
  5. Spend you Bitcoins

So let’s try to decode all this horse-play and do some Multi-Sig Wallet Stuff— BEFORE YOU BEGIN Questions— Pre-Multi-sig Wallet Creation – How many users must sign to release the coins in this Multi-sig wallet – 1 ? 2 ? 3 – make sure you have access to the PrivateKeys of these. You must have access to the PrivateKey of the wallet address you use. Because of the Version of Bitcoin code you can only create a 1 ? 2 or 3 user Multi-Sig wallet- the code will not support a more complex Multi-Sig structure right now, in the future you will be able to create 5 of 7 or 8 of 15 or what ever weird way you want to release your  money from these Multi-Sig Wallets. Todays code only allows 1-2 or 3 signatures to release funds. So once you have this figured out we can begin to generate the NEW Wallet ADDRESS:

Pay to Script

Pay to Script code’s it all and delivers it to the blockchain

PRE-Multi-Sig Address Generation: For our example below I will use 3 different Wallets I generate for this test, these are throw away addresses but you can use them to test it your self.

  1. 1Pum4jukypYddQDywoQDcgdkz7NMKKHXGR
  2. 1L7xm1TrwpsNBCrAaNUw8eBwD115Tr7tpC
  3. 145dwy7fvmRJwMpXDVzuZpNSd6UwEbabk2

I am assuming that you are running BitcoinD on your server – if you run Bitcoin-qt you will have access to this command. You can use the “CreateMultiSig” or the “AddMultiSigAddress” commands // they  will generate the Multi-Sig Bitcoin Address, but “CreateMultiSig” is the only one that will give you back the  – “redeemScript” –  and you need this script to get your Bitcoins out of the Multi-Sig address wallet. (Bitcoin Ver 8.9)

1.createmultisig <nrequired> <‘[“key,”key”]’> Creates a multi-signature address and returns a json object “redeemScript”

 

2. addmultisigaddress <nrequired> <‘[“key”,”key”]’> [account] Add a nrequired-to-sign multisignature address to the wallet. Each key is a bitcoin address or hex-encoded public key. If [account] is specified, assign address to [account]. ”NO-redeemScript”

Step 1 – Generate Bitcoin Wallet Address //  It will starts with a number “3”. nRequired you need 1, 2 or 3 signatures to release the funds I have chosen any 2 of the 3 Bitcoin Address listed in the command below can release the coins in the NEW Multi-Sig address—

CREATEMULTISIG

COMMAND:

bitcoind createmultisig 2 ‘[“1Pum4jukypYddQDywoQDcgdkz7NMKKHXGR“, “1L7xm1TrwpsNBCrAaNUw8eBwD115Tr7tpC“, “145dwy7fvmRJwMpXDVzuZpNSd6UwEbabk2“]’

OUTPUT: {     “address” : “3DLwoeBuoQRMUDvqvbwQCiYnpauxwC1i71″,    

redeemScript” : “5221022934c1f3ddc25426fc057ca706d66d818f63f00f3bb4ad4762947ec23b8c316e210343e871878f6a66728c2a8bec2ae0bffbd4c862968e20280526645f4157de7fca21022a453e7eea23207f87c46881b2e63f56c5ec2e59b30fe887ef29bd21ed67c15d53ae” }

So now you can give this new Multi-Sig address to people – 3DLwoeBuoQRMUDvqvbwQCiYnpauxwC1i71 –  Now you have your NEW Bitcoin Multi-Sig address and people can start to send money to this wallet address. I sent some Bitcoins to this NEW Multi-Sig address from my Wallet . Then I went to my Bitcoin console and typed in:

GETRECEIVEBYADDRESS

COMMAND: bitcoind getreceivedbyaddress 3DLwoeBuoQRMUDvqvbwQCiYnpauxwC1i71

OUTPUT: 0.00300000

Now I know my NEW Multi-Sig Wallet is in working order and registered in the blockchain remember if it not registered in the blockchain then it nothing NADA-one zip. Rules of the Muliti-Signature Wallet

  • All MultiSig address start with the number “3” a regular Bitcoin address start with the number “1”.
  • You can only have a 1-2 or 3 part Multi-Sig wallet. We cannot do a 5 or 7 part Multi-sig transaction today do to the core Bitcoin CODE.

So now I have a NEW Bitcoin Address —3DLwoeBuoQRMUDvqvbwQCiYnpauxwC1i71  —  and now people can send Bitcoins to that address as much as they want and it acts just like a normal Bitcoin Wallet.

Step 2 – GET MONEY OUT of a Multi-Sig address Wallet — So now i can look at my Multi-sig wallet and check to see if I have any money in my account

LISTUNSPENT COMMAND:

bitcoind listunspent OUTPUT:     {        

txid” : “c45c8c00243c703412e207646d51bf6878444537c37372528012f412f552b9cd”,        

“vout” : 0,        

“address” : “3DLwoeBuoQRMUDvqvbwQCiYnpauxwC1i71″,        

“account” : “”,        

scriptPubKey” : “a9147fd5c07649707498b47a50039bdcadc703e7e85e87″,        

redeemScript” : “5221022934c1f3ddc25426fc057ca706d66d818f63f00f3bb4ad4762947ec23b8c316e210343e871878f6a66728c2a8bec2ae0bffbd4c862968e20280526645f4157de7fca21022a453e7eea23207f87c46881b2e63f56c5ec2e59b30fe887ef29bd21ed67c15d53ae”,        

“amount” : 0.00300000,        

“confirmations” : 1,        

“spendable” : true     }

As you can see by the output and remember this is all in the blockchain  https://blockchain.info/tx/c45c8c00243c703412e207646d51bf6878444537c37372528012f412f552b9cd

SINGRAWTRANSACTION Now we need to sign the release of funds from this address with the

signrawtransaction COMMAND this is the syntax but if you look carefully you will see txid scriptPubKey”, redeemScript and if you look above OUTPUT: with my LISTUNSPENT command you will see this information.

Now you just need the PrivateKey to sign the transaction. signrawtransaction <hex string> [{“txid“:txid,”vout”:n,”scriptPubKey“:hex,”redeemScript“:hex},…] [<privatekey1>,…] [sighashtype=”ALL”]

  • Sign inputs for raw transaction (serialized, hex-encoded).
  • Second optional argument (may be null) is an array of previous transaction outputs that this transaction depends on but may not yet be in the block chain.
  • Third optional argument (may be null) is an array of base58-encoded private keys that, if given, will be the only keys used to sign the transaction.
  • Fourth optional argument is a string that is one of six values; ALL, NONE, SINGLE or ALL|ANYONECANPAY, NONE|ANYONECANPAY, SINGLE|ANYONECANPAY.
  • Returns json object with keys:
    • hex : raw transaction with signature(s) (hex-encoded string)
    • complete : 1 if transaction has a complete set of signature (0 if not)

SENDRAWTRANSACTION  Once all signed the TX it will produce a HEX string – we take that info and add it to

SENDRAWTRANSACTION and I will finally get my Bitcoins and spend them from my Multi-sig wallet. You can keep putting money into this wallet and just have them signed and you can keep getting money out forever- this is just another  Bitcoin wallet address with a few gatekeepers, it harder but more secure in the long run. hope this helps a little – In my new BIP32 wallet I have all this out in a nice GUI to Keep it simple but still have the power of an escrow Multi-sig Wallet- gAtO OuT

3. signrawtransaction <hexstring> [{“txid”:txid,”vout”:n,”scriptPubKey”:hex},…] [<privatekey1>,…] version 0.7 Adds signatures to a raw transaction and returns the resulting raw transaction. Y/N

 

sendrawtransaction <hexstring> version 0.7 Submits raw transaction (serialized, hex-encoded) to local node and network. N

 

4. createrawtransaction [{“txid”:txid,”vout”:n},…] {address:amount,…} version 0.7 Creates a raw transaction spending given inputs. N

 

decoderawtransaction <hex string> version 0.7 Produces a human-readable JSON object for a raw transaction. N

 

listunspent [minconf=1] [maxconf=999999] version 0.7 Returns array of unspent transaction inputs in the wallet.

 

listlockunspent version 0.8 Returns list of temporarily unspendable outputs

 

lockunspent <unlock?> [array-of-objects] version 0.8 Updates list of temporarily unspendable outputs

https://gist.github.com/gavinandresen/3966071

03/24/13

Tor is NOT the ONLY Anonymous Network

gAtO fOuNd – this very interesting and wanted to share –

Tor does some things good, but other anonymous networks do other things better. Only when used together do they work best. And of course you want to already know how to use them should something happen to Tor and you are forced to move to another network.fin_07

Try them! You may even find something interesting you cannot find on Tor!

Anonymous networks

These are well known and widely deployed anonymous networks that offer strong anonymity and high security. They are all open source, in active development, have been online for many years and resisted attack attempts. They run on multiple operating systems and are safe to use with default settings. All are well regarded.

  • Tor – Fast anonymous internet access, hidden websites, most well known.
  • I2P – Hidden websites, anonymous bittorrent, mail, out-proxy to internet, other services.
  • Freenet – Static website hosting, distributed file storage for large files, decentralized forums.

Less well known

Also anonymous networks, but less used and possibly more limited in functionality.

  • GnuNet – Anonymous distributed file storage.
  • OneSwarm – Bittorrent, has a non-anonymous mode, requires friends for anonymity.
  • RetroShare – File-sharing, chat, forums, mail. Requires friends, and not anonymous to those friends, only the rest of the network.
  • Omemo – Distributed social storage platform. Uncertain to what extent it is anonymous.

Non-free networks

These are anonymous networks, but are not open source. Therefore their security and anonymity properties is hard to impossible to verify, and though the applications are legit, they may have serious weaknesses. Do not rely on them for strong anonymity.

  • Osiris – Serverless portal system, does not claim to provide any real anonymity.

In development

  • Phantom – Hidden Services, native IPv6 transport.
  • GlobaLeaks – Open Source Whistleblowing Framework.
  • FreedomBox – Project to create personal servers for distributed social networking, email and audio/video communications.
  • Telex – A new way to circumvent Internet censorship.
  • Project Byzantium – Bootable live distribution of Linux to set up wireless mesh nodes with commonly available hardware.
  • Hyperboria A distributed meshnet built on cjdns.

Routing Platforms

These are internets overlaid on the internet. They provide security via encryption, but only provides weak to none anonymity on their own. Only standard tools such as OpenVPN and Quagga are required to connect. Responsibility for a sufficiently anonymous setup is placed on the user and their advertised routes. More suited for private groups as things out in the open can be firewalled by other participants. Can be layered above or below other anonymity nets for more security and fun.

  • Anonet – AnoNet2, a more open replacement for AnoNet1.
  • dn42 – Another highly technical routing community.
  • CJDNS, an IPV6 overlay network that provides end to end encryption. It is not anonymous by itself.

Alternative Internet

  • Netsukuku – A project that aims to build a global P2P online network completely independent from the Internet by using Wi-Fi. The software is still in active development, although the site is no longer updated. A new site is in progress of being built.
  • Many other wireless communities building mesh networks as an alternative to the Internet, e.g. Freifunk, http://guifi.net and many more around the globe. see also

Alternative domain name systems

  • Namecoin – Cryptocurrency with the added ability to support a decentralised domain name system currently as a .bit.
  • OpenNIC – A user controlled Network Information Center offering a democratic, non-national, alternative to the traditional Top-Level Domain registries.
  • Dot-P2P – Another decentralized DNS service without centralized registry operators (at July 18, 2012 page is not accessible and has not known anything about the status of project from February 2011).

See Also

03/10/13

Finding the Bad Guy’s in Tor -triangulated irregular network

gAtO ThInKiNg - a car GPS works very simple, It takes the delay time from one geo-positioned satellite and compares is to another geo-positional satellite and estimates the position of the GPS in my CAR – I think they call it satellite triangulation or something cool, it’s been done with radios to guide pilots navigate ever since they developed radios. We do it with satellite and we can use networks too.

triangulated irregular network  -So now apply this to the Tor bad guy’s websites- a hidden service!math_clouadTag

With a simple command you can get the time it takes to crawl a website, so you have one server in the U.S one is South America, one in Europe and one in Asia and we run the same command getting the delays from each location. I bet with a little math and some basic network tools we could figure out the geo-location of any given website in Tor. One of my good mentors told me that in my crawls I was capturing timing information, we all see timing information with a simple ping command in the clear web but in Tor – UDP is unsupported so it does not work -//- we must take into account the Tor network thru-put and utilization bit that’s easy to get from a number of Tor tools.

Reverse triangulation of a network server should be easy to find with a little math, just take a good sample and the longer you wait the more data you collect and the better the chance you can find a geo-location of a website. We do this in the clear web all the time we can see bad areas of the world that are bad spammers, and other like mail from Africa Prince Scams offering you millions if you send them some money to cover the transfer, or Russian and Chinese phishing attacks. So we know geo-location and some IP are more prime to bad actors and we can draw a profile, a geo-location of a place and/or  country or an ISP so not having the IP of a Tor server may not be neededto find them we could use network triangulation. “triangulated irregular network  ” So the same thing can be done with networks and timing delays of data back and forth from a // client <–> Tor OR <–>server.

I got a crazy Idea that may or may-not work, but it sounds good—//  so— Now if I can only find a government grant and a good math major to help out and we have a big business model to find the bad guy’s geo-location even in Tor - gAtO oUt…

03/9/13

Tor Website 36% are Criminals Sites

gAtO iS CrAwLliNg websites-We just completed our new crawl of Tor URL that we found. We started with 2,000 URL’s and we got about 550 positives from this first run. This will change since some sites go up and down for no rhyme or reason. I went back to verify one site that my crawl picked up with all kinds of good information but later when I went back it would not come up. So this is an ongoing thing in order to map out all of Tor’s hidden service websites. From the preliminary data Pedo sites are about 18% of the sites we discovered another 4-6% guns and assassins and another 14-16% of different criminal type’s of sites or scams. So that is over 36% of the sites we found were criminal type, that is not good for anyone.

Crawling Tor Hidden Service - websites

Crawling Tor Hidden Service – websites

Tor is an excellent software for being private and having some level of safety but this new light is not good for the people that want to use Tor and the Dark Web to do good things and positive things. Now we see that the bad guys are all over Tor-Dark Web we hope this list will help it become better.

This list is only available to Law enforcement, governments and selected security companies, you must be verified first before you can get a hold of this list of Onion websites in Tor. This is not a free list (we have to recover our cost of r&d) and this is only the first steps we have gained over 12,000 new URL in Tor from this crawl and will be doing more crawls and adding more information to the list.

What really freaked us out was the undocumented website that are not in any hidden wiki in Tor and the number of them being put out by criminals. Now some of the other information that we collected see list below will give us a baseline like — Last-Modified: — will give us an indication of how active they are. The —Server: & Web Application:— will give us the web app they use and from the looks of things some are vulnerable to all kinds of hacking attacks. Tor websites are the same as any site and if you don’t update your website, well your vulnerable to hacking from anyone and in Tor you don’t have a clue because they are protected just like the site.

This will be an ongoing crawl for the next year or so, so expect the list to grow and as new data is collected more will be revealed about the how, and the use of Tor and who uses Tor will become not just theories but facts that we can verify - gAtO OuT 

Internal URL’s – 

 [url] 

    [content_type]

    [http_code]

    [header_size]

    [request_size]

    [filetime]

    [ssl_verify_result]

    [redirect_count]

    [total_time]

    [namelookup_time] 

    [connect_time]

    [pretransfer_time]

    [size_upload] => 0

    [size_download] => 124

    [speed_download] => 7

    [speed_upload]

    [download_content_length] 

    [upload_content_length]

    [starttransfer_time]

    [redirect_time]

    [certinfo] 

Cache-Control

Expires: 

Pragma: 

HTTP

Server:

Crawl Date:

Content-Type: 

Content-Length:

Last-Modified:

Connection:

Accept-Ranges:

Proxy-Connection: 

Set-Cookie:

Content-Length: 

Accept-Ranges:

Web Application:

 

10/18/12

Tor hidden service secrets

Tor hidden service secrets

gAtO fRiDaY 10-18-2012 update hay you want to see a secret -hidden service –

Creative Hack – http://2kcreatydoneqybu.onion 

on top of this the name is custom – so that took extra time and efforts and the site is real when you have thier secret token — https://ahmia.fi/pagescreenshots/2kcreatydoneqybu.png

here you can take a look at this site anyway – try to extract any information from this secret Tor Website – you can’t see any source code – so you can’t make it error to extract information. I ask a friend that’s a Penn Tester to check this out – If anyone can extract any information please let me know –gAtOoUt

gAtO fRiDaY - sound off! – As i play with my new Tor hidden service – “Ok just apache website running https: a static site -right now” – What we know is that a Tor hidden service stays hidden until you send someone your .onion URL (example:- otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion ) now once you know the URL your have access to the site. You may have to log in like on most bb sites but at least you reached the hidden service and now you can do stuff. 

While looking at the torrc file setting I found a little secret that with (server side) HiddenServiceAuthorizeClient-tag and the HidServAuth-tag on the (client) side -// your hidden service is now INVISIBLE to only the people that have a secret key installed in their “torrc” client file. In plain talk –

1. I put a special key on my hidden server – torrc file – HiddenServiceAuthorizeClient
2. generate a new key for client side – “what_ever_bcuuw46b3heyy”
3. send keys to the secret agents that can see or access the site HidServAuth
4. Only the people with my KEY can get to the front door of my hidden service – torrc file HidServAuth

This makes it hard to find the hidden service even if you have the URL ///./. it does nothing, no source code like a normal website. I ran into a few of these and had no clue why these sites behaved the way they did. I can pick apart most websites, at least, basics like html, asp, js, java directory you can gleam all kinds of information. But if you hit one of these site in Tor well it a big 0 -zero -///.

With my TDS project (Tor Directory Scan) I am generating an onion URL A-Za-z 2-7 URL and going out to scrape it and get some basic information about the site with a basic web crawler that grabs METADATA and not just links to other pages. If I hit these sites with my basic program I’ll get a dud -zero -///- but I will have a hit of sort. I hope to catch some of these sites – we all know the rcp command works well in Tor sometimes I found and httrack is another tool for sucking up site // be they hidden service or not – these secret hidden services will be very interesting in the scan -gATO oUt

— Tor Syntax

HiddenServiceAuthorizeClient auth-type client-name,client-name,…
If configured, the hidden service is accessible for authorized clients only. The auth-type can either be ‘basic’ for a general-purpose authorization protocol or ‘stealth’ for a less scalable protocol that also hides service activity from unauthorized clients. Only clients that are listed here are authorized to access the hidden service. Valid client names are 1 to 19 characters long and only use characters in A-Za-z0-9+-_ (no spaces). If this option is set, the hidden service is not accessible for clients without authorization any more. Generated authorization data can be found in the hostname file. Clients need to put this authorization data in their configuration file using HidServAuth.


HidServAuth onion-address auth-cookie [service-name]
Client authorization for a hidden service. Valid onion addresses contain 16 characters in a-z2-7 plus “.onion”, and valid auth cookies contain 22 characters in A-Za-z0-9+/. The service name is only used for internal purposes, e.g., for Tor controllers. This option may be used multiple times for different hidden services. If a hidden service uses authorization and this option is not set, the hidden service is not accessible. Hidden services can be configured to require authorization using the HiddenServiceAuthorizeClient option

10/1/12

USCyberLabs has a hidden service Tor otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion

gAtO wAnTeD – to get our USCyberLabs Tor .onion network -hidden service- up and running and after thinking of other future projects we decided to make our Ubuntu -BackTrack 5 machine be our Tor Server running apache2 hidden service  . My BT5 machine is running – Gnone v.2.30.2 Ubuntu build 06/25/2010 ?

Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu) Server at otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion Port 80

1. First problem BT5 is designed to run as root and Tor is not so first thing is to generate a new user:

uscyberlabs - el gatoMalo

gAtO new hidden service otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion

# adduser gato

# password gato-password

For help go to man adduser for more information

I open up terminal for everything so as SU -(SuperUser)

nano /etc/apache2/apache2.conf > file

nano /etc/apache2/ports.conf > file

nano /lib/tor/torrc -> file

nano /etc/host -> file

2. Before we change users and start to work as gato let’s set up the apache2 service

# apt-get install apache2

whizz, bang ,- wow and it’s installed next we need to modify some configuration files.

The Apache install will install /var/www/index.html <— so modify this file for your web site:

The Apache install will install /etc/apache2 and in it you will find a bunch of the configuration files:

apache2.conf and ports.conf these two files will have to be modified and Tor torrc file.

This is a great guide — from ioerror  —but don’t try the wiki – – https://github.com/ioerror/hs-wiki/tree/master/configs another guide not so good but it helped —http://www.martini.nu/blog/2010/06/tor-vbox.html    —

ports-apache2.conf 

12 NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1:8080Listen 127.0.0.1:8080

torrc

123

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

# some information may be for future projects -# This is a very minimal Tor configuration file to be placed in# /etc/tor/torrc unless you know better.

#

# This configuration file should be used with a wiki Hidden Service on

# 127.0.0.1:8080

#

 

Log notice file /var/log/tor/wiki.log

DataDirectory /var/lib/tor

 

HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/hidden_service/

HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080

Add your hidden Service Tor url to your host file – trust me this really helped during trouble shooting

I added my Hidden service onion ID to the

nano /etc/host -> file

127.0.0.1 otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion 

I generated a few more hidden service keys to deploy some other sites later -Open up 2 more terminal windows – I can start stuff in background mode but during testing everything has it’s own terminal just in case.

To install Tor on unbuntu linux — https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-doc-unix.html.en  —

To start Tor

./start-tor-browser

To start Apache web server

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 start

I’m not going to give you my directory structure but just a heads up :

DataDirectory  /var/lib/tor/

HiddenServiceDir /var/www/web_hidden_service

HiddenServicePort 80:127.0.0.1:8080

Since I’m testing I log to my terminal but a log error file will work better

Log notice stdout

So ok now comes the test – I have a static html website – a hidden service in the Tor .onion network. I did not go to icann for an domain name and pay them- I don’t have to pay InMotion for hosting service – just my cox-internet connection and a spare machine and I have a website in the dark web – This machine will host other websites – hidden services like wordpress, a bb bulletin board- or maybe some other web service – It will host my BotNet for the Tor Directory Project – Oh yeah I want to build a few bot’s for GOOD and map out the Tor Directory and make each Bot an OR (onion Router) so it helps the cause and gives back a bit. I plan to also run OnionOO – Arm – Atlas – mOnionO Compass and Weather.

SO if your out an about in Tor Land come on by and kick the tires and peek and poke my Tor hidden service website – otwxbdvje5ttplpv.onion  if you find any openings let me know.pls As I add new features I will tell you about them -gAtO oUt 

09/28/12

Tor Command syntax

gAtO wAnT’s – just the simple command syntax -from the OG-OR Roger Dingledine -Nick Mathewson the Tor gods.

href=”http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/hardy/man8/tor.8.html#contenttoc6″>

 

NAME

       tor - The second-generation onion router

SYNOPSIS

       tor [OPTION value]...

DESCRIPTION

       tor  is  a connection-oriented anonymizing communication service. Users
       choose a source-routed path through a set of  nodes,  and  negotiate  a
       "virtual  circuit"  through  the  network, in which each node knows its
       predecessor and successor, but no  others.  Traffic  flowing  down  the
       circuit is unwrapped by a symmetric key at each node, which reveals the
       downstream node.

       Basically  tor  provides  a  distributed  network  of  servers  ("onion
       routers"). Users bounce their TCP streams -- web traffic, ftp, ssh, etc
       -- around the routers, and recipients, observers, and even the  routers
       themselves have difficulty tracking the source of the stream.

OPTIONS

       -h, -help Display a short help message and exit.

       -f FILE
              FILE   contains   further   "option   value"   pairs.  (Default:
              /etc/tor/torrc)

       --hash-password
              Generates a hashed password for control port access.

       --list-fingerprint
              Generate your keys and output your nickname and fingerprint.

       --verify-config
              Verify the configuration file is valid.

       --nt-service
              --service [install|remove|start|stop]  Manage  the  Tor  Windows
              NT/2000/XP  service.   Current  instructions  can  be  found  at
              http://wiki.noreply.org/noreply/TheOnionRouter/TorFAQ#WinNTService

       --list-torrc-options
              List all valid options.

       --version
              Display Tor version.

       Other options can be specified either on the command-line (--option
              value),  or  in  the configuration file (option value).  Options
              are case-insensitive.

       BandwidthRate N bytes|KB|MB|GB|TB
              A token bucket limits the average incoming  bandwidth  usage  on
              this  node  to the specified number of bytes per second, and the
              average outgoing bandwidth usage to that same value. (Default: 3
              MB)

       BandwidthBurst N bytes|KB|MB|GB|TB
              Limit the maximum token bucket size (also known as the burst) to
              the given number of bytes in each direction. This  value  should
              be at least twice your BandwidthRate. (Default: 6 MB)

       MaxAdvertisedBandwidth N bytes|KB|MB|GB|TB
              If set, we will not advertise more than this amount of bandwidth
              for our BandwidthRate. Server operators who want to  reduce  the
              number  of clients who ask to build circuits through them (since
              this is proportional to  advertised  bandwidth  rate)  can  thus
              reduce the CPU demands on their server without impacting network
              performance.

       ConnLimit NUM
              The minimum number of file descriptors that must be available to
              the Tor process before it will start. Tor will ask the OS for as
              many file descriptors as the OS will allow (you can find this by
              "ulimit -H -n"). If this number is less than ConnLimit, then Tor
              will refuse to start.

              You probably don’t need to adjust this.  It  has  no  effect  on
              Windows since that platform lacks getrlimit(). (Default: 1000)

       ControlPort Port
              If set, Tor will accept connections on this port and allow those
              connections to control the Tor process  using  the  Tor  Control
              Protocol (described in control-spec.txt).  Note: unless you also
              specify one of  HashedControlPassword  or  CookieAuthentication,
              setting  this  option will cause Tor to allow any process on the
              local host to control it. This option is required for  many  Tor
              controllers; most use the value of 9051.

       ControlListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind  the  controller listener to this address. If you specify a
              port, bind to  this  port  rather  than  the  one  specified  in
              ControlPort.  We  strongly  recommend  that you leave this alone
              unless you know what you’re doing, since giving attackers access
              to   your   control  listener  is  really  dangerous.  (Default:
              127.0.0.1) This directive can be  specified  multiple  times  to
              bind to multiple addresses/ports.

       HashedControlPassword hashed_password
              Don’t  allow any connections on the control port except when the
              other  process  knows  the  password  whose  one-way   hash   is
              hashed_password.   You  can  compute  the  hash of a password by
              running "tor --hash-password password".

       CookieAuthentication 0|1
              If this option is set to 1, don’t allow any connections  on  the
              control  port  except  when  the  connecting  process  knows the
              contents of a file named "control_auth_cookie", which  Tor  will
              create  in  its  data  directory.   This  authentication methods
              should only be used on systems with  good  filesystem  security.
              (Default: 0)

       DataDirectory DIR
              Store working data in DIR (Default: /var/lib/tor)

       DirServer [nickname] [flags] address:port fingerprint
              Use a nonstandard authoritative directory server at the provided
              address and port, with  the  specified  key  fingerprint.   This
              option  can  be  repeated many times, for multiple authoritative
              directory servers.  Flags are separated by spaces, and determine
              what  kind of an authority this directory is.  By default, every
              authority is authoritative for current ("v2")-style directories,
              unless  the  "no-v2"  flag  is  given.   If  the  "v1"  flags is
              provided, Tor will use this server as an authority for old-style
              (v1)  directories  as  well.  (Only directory mirrors care about
              this.)  Tor will use this server  as  an  authority  for  hidden
              service information if the "hs" flag is set, or if the "v1" flag
              is set and the "no-hs" flag is not set.  If a flag "orport=port"
              is  given,  Tor  will  use the given port when opening encrypted
              tunnels to the dirserver.  If no dirserver line  is  given,  Tor
              will  use  the  default directory servers.  NOTE: this option is
              intended for setting up a  private  Tor  network  with  its  own
              directory   authorities.    If   you   use   it,   you  will  be
              distinguishable from other users, because you won’t believe  the
              same authorities they do.

       FetchHidServDescriptors 0|1
              If set to 0, Tor will never fetch any hidden service descriptors
              from the rendezvous directories. This option is only  useful  if
              you’re  using  a Tor controller that handles hidserv fetches for
              you.  (Default: 1)

       FetchServerDescriptors 0|1
              If set to 0, Tor will never fetch any network  status  summaries
              or server descriptors from the directory servers. This option is
              only useful if  you’re  using  a  Tor  controller  that  handles
              directory fetches for you.  (Default: 1)

       FetchUselessDescriptors 0|1
              If  set  to 1, Tor will fetch every non-obsolete descriptor from
              the authorities that it hears about. Otherwise,  it  will  avoid
              fetching  useless  descriptors, for example for routers that are
              not  running.   This  option  is  useful  if  you’re  using  the
              contributed  "exitlist"  script to enumerate Tor nodes that exit
              to certain addresses.  (Default: 0)

       Group GID
              On startup, setgid to this group.

       HttpProxy host[:port]
              Tor will make all its directory requests through this  host:port
              (or  host:80  if  port is not specified), rather than connecting
              directly to any directory servers.

       HttpProxyAuthenticator username:password
              If defined, Tor will use this username:password for  Basic  Http
              proxy authentication, as in RFC 2617. This is currently the only
              form of Http proxy authentication that Tor supports;  feel  free
              to submit a patch if you want it to support others.

       HttpsProxy host[:port]
              Tor  will  make  all  its  OR  (SSL)  connections  through  this
              host:port (or host:443 if  port  is  not  specified),  via  HTTP
              CONNECT  rather  than  connecting  directly to servers.  You may
              want to set FascistFirewall to restrict the  set  of  ports  you
              might  try  to  connect  to,  if  your  Https  proxy only allows
              connecting to certain ports.

       HttpsProxyAuthenticator username:password
              If defined, Tor will use this username:password for Basic  Https
              proxy authentication, as in RFC 2617. This is currently the only
              form of Https proxy authentication that Tor supports; feel  free
              to submit a patch if you want it to support others.

       KeepalivePeriod NUM
              To  keep  firewalls  from  expiring  connections, send a padding
              keepalive cell every NUM seconds on open connections that are in
              use.  If the connection has no open circuits, it will instead be
              closed after NUM seconds of idleness. (Default: 5 minutes)

       Log minSeverity[-maxSeverity] stderr|stdout|syslog
              Send all messages between minSeverity  and  maxSeverity  to  the
              standard  output  stream,  the  standard error stream, or to the
              system log. (The "syslog" value  is  only  supported  on  Unix.)
              Recognized  severity  levels  are debug, info, notice, warn, and
              err.  We advise using "notice" in  most  cases,  since  anything
              more  verbose  may  provide sensitive information to an attacker
              who obtains the logs.  If only one severity level is given,  all
              messages  of  that  level  or  higher will be sent to the listed
              destination.

       Log minSeverity[-maxSeverity] file FILENAME
              As above, but send log messages to  the  listed  filename.   The
              "Log"  option may appear more than once in a configuration file.
              Messages are sent to all the  logs  that  match  their  severity
              level.

       OutboundBindAddress IP
              Make  all  outbound  connections  originate  from the IP address
              specified.  This is only useful when you have  multiple  network
              interfaces,  and  you  want all of Tor’s outgoing connections to
              use a single one.

       PidFile FILE
              On startup, write our PID to FILE.  On  clean  shutdown,  remove
              FILE.

       ProtocolWarnings 0|1
              If  1,  Tor will log with severity ’warn’ various cases of other
              parties not following the Tor specification. Otherwise, they are
              logged with severity ’info’. (Default: 0)

       RunAsDaemon 0|1
              If  1,  Tor  forks and daemonizes to the background. This option
              has no effect on Windows; instead you should use  the  --service
              command-line option. (Default: 0)

       SafeLogging 0|1
              If  1,  Tor  replaces  potentially sensitive strings in the logs
              (e.g. addresses) with the string [scrubbed]. This way  logs  can
              still   be  useful,  but  they  don’t  leave  behind  personally
              identifying information about  what  sites  a  user  might  have
              visited. (Default: 1)

       User UID
              On startup, setuid to this user.

       HardwareAccel 0|1
              If  non-zero,  try  to  use  crypto  hardware  acceleration when
              available. This is untested and probably buggy. (Default: 0)

       AvoidDiskWrites 0|1
              If non-zero, try to write to disk less frequently than we  would
              otherwise.  This is useful when running on flash memory or other
              media that support only a limited number of  writes.   (Default:
              0)

       TunnelDirConns 0|1
              If  non-zero, when a directory server we contact supports it, we
              will build a one-hop circuit and make  an  encrypted  connection
              via its ORPort. (Default: 0)

       PreferTunneledDirConns 0|1
              If  non-zero, we will avoid directory servers that don’t support
              tunneled directory connections, when possible. (Default: 0)

CLIENT OPTIONS

       The following  options  are  useful  only  for  clients  (that  is,  if
       SocksPort is non-zero):

       AllowInvalidNodes entry|exit|middle|introduction|rendezvous|...
              If  some  Tor  servers  are  obviously  not  working  right, the
              directory authorities can manually mark them as invalid, meaning
              that  it’s  not  recommended  you  use  them  for  entry or exit
              positions in your circuits. You can opt  to  use  them  in  some
              circuit  positions,  though. The default is "middle,rendezvous",
              and other choices are not advised.

       CircuitBuildTimeout NUM
              Try for at most NUM  seconds  when  building  circuits.  If  the
              circuit  isn’t  open  in  that time, give up on it.  (Default: 1
              minute.)

       CircuitIdleTimeout NUM
              If we have keept a clean (never used)  circuit  around  for  NUM
              seconds, then close it. This way when the Tor client is entirely
              idle, it can expire all of its circuits, and then expire its TLS
              connections.  Also,  if  we  end up making a circuit that is not
              useful for exiting any of the requests we’re receiving, it won’t
              forever  take up a slot in the circuit list.  (Default: 1 hour.)

       ClientOnly 0|1
              If set to 1, Tor will under no circumstances run  as  a  server.
              The  default  is to run as a client unless ORPort is configured.
              (Usually, you don’t need to set this; Tor  is  pretty  smart  at
              figuring  out whether you are reliable and high-bandwidth enough
              to be a useful server.)  (Default: 0)

       ExcludeNodes nickname,nickname,...
              A list of nodes to never use when building a circuit.

       EntryNodes nickname,nickname,...
              A list of preferred nodes to  use  for  the  first  hop  in  the
              circuit.    These   are   treated  only  as  preferences  unless
              StrictEntryNodes (see below) is also set.

       ExitNodes nickname,nickname,...
              A list of preferred nodes  to  use  for  the  last  hop  in  the
              circuit.    These   are   treated  only  as  preferences  unless
              StrictExitNodes (see below) is also set.

       StrictEntryNodes 0|1
              If 1, Tor will never use  any  nodes  besides  those  listed  in
              "EntryNodes" for the first hop of a circuit.

       StrictExitNodes 0|1
              If  1,  Tor  will  never  use  any nodes besides those listed in
              "ExitNodes" for the last hop of a circuit.

       FascistFirewall 0|1
              If 1, Tor will only create outgoing connections to  ORs  running
              on  ports that your firewall allows (defaults to 80 and 443; see
              FirewallPorts).  This will allow you to  run  Tor  as  a  client
              behind  a firewall with restrictive policies, but will not allow
              you to run as a server behind such a firewall.  This  option  is
              deprecated; use ReachableAddresses instead.

       FirewallPorts PORTS
              A  list  of  ports  that your firewall allows you to connect to.
              Only  used  when  FascistFirewall  is  set.   This   option   is
              deprecated; use ReachableAddresses instead. (Default: 80, 443)

       ReachableAddresses ADDR[/MASK][:PORT]...
              A  comma-separated  list  of  IP  addresses  and ports that your
              firewall allows you to connect to. The  format  is  as  for  the
              addresses  in  ExitPolicy,  except  that  "accept" is understood
              unless  "reject"   is   explicitly   provided.    For   example,
              ’ReachableAddresses  99.0.0.0/8,  reject  18.0.0.0/8:80,  accept
              *:80’ means that your firewall allows connections to  everything
              inside  net  99,  rejects  port  80  connections  to net 18, and
              accepts connections to port  80  otherwise.   (Default:  ’accept
              *:*’.)

       ReachableDirAddresses ADDR[/MASK][:PORT]...
              Like  ReachableAddresses,  a  list  of addresses and ports.  Tor
              will   obey   these   restrictions   when   fetching   directory
              information,  using  standard  HTTP  GET  requests.  If  not set
              explicitly then the value of  ReachableAddresses  is  used.   If
              HttpProxy  is  set  then  these connections will go through that
              proxy.

       ReachableORAddresses ADDR[/MASK][:PORT]...
              Like ReachableAddresses, a list of  addresses  and  ports.   Tor
              will  obey  these restrictions when connecting to Onion Routers,
              using  TLS/SSL.   If  not  set  explicitly  then  the  value  of
              ReachableAddresses  is  used.  If  HttpsProxy  is set then these
              connections will go through that proxy.

              The     separation     between     ReachableORAddresses      and
              ReachableDirAddresses   is   only   interesting   when  you  are
              connecting through proxies (see HttpProxy and HttpsProxy).  Most
              proxies  limit  TLS  connections  (which  Tor uses to connect to
              Onion Routers) to port 443, and some  limit  HTTP  GET  requests
              (which  Tor uses for fetching directory information) to port 80.

       LongLivedPorts PORTS
              A list of ports for services  that  tend  to  have  long-running
              connections  (e.g.  chat  and  interactive shells). Circuits for
              streams that use  these  ports  will  contain  only  high-uptime
              nodes,  to reduce the chance that a node will go down before the
              stream is finished.  (Default: 21, 22, 706,  1863,  5050,  5190,
              5222, 5223, 6667, 6697, 8300)

       MapAddress address newaddress
              When a request for address arrives to Tor, it will rewrite it to
              newaddress before processing it. For example, if you always want
              connections  to  www.indymedia.org  to exit via torserver (where
              torserver is  the  nickname  of  the  server),  use  "MapAddress
              www.indymedia.org www.indymedia.org.torserver.exit".

       NewCircuitPeriod NUM
              Every  NUM  seconds  consider  whether  to  build a new circuit.
              (Default: 30 seconds)

       MaxCircuitDirtiness NUM
              Feel free to reuse a circuit that was first  used  at  most  NUM
              seconds  ago, but never attach a new stream to a circuit that is
              too old.  (Default: 10 minutes)

       EnforceDistinctSubnets 0|1
              If 1, Tor will not put two servers whose IP addresses  are  "too
              close"  on  the same circuit.  Currently, two addresses are "too
              close" if they lie in the same /16 range. (Default: 1)

       RendNodes nickname,nickname,...
              A list of preferred nodes to use for the  rendezvous  point,  if
              possible.

       RendExcludeNodes nickname,nickname,...
              A list of nodes to never use when choosing a rendezvous point.

       SocksPort PORT
              Advertise  this  port  to  listen  for  connections  from Socks-
              speaking applications.  Set this to 0 if you don’t want to allow
              application connections. (Default: 9050)

       SocksListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind  to  this  address  to  listen  for connections from Socks-
              speaking applications. (Default: 127.0.0.1) You can also specify
              a port (e.g. 192.168.0.1:9100).  This directive can be specified
              multiple times to bind to multiple addresses/ports.

       SocksPolicy policy,policy,...
              Set an entrance policy for this server, to limit who can connect
              to  the  Socks  ports.   The policies have the same form as exit
              policies below.

       SocksTimeout NUM
              Let a socks connection wait NUM  seconds  handshaking,  and  NUM
              seconds unattached waiting for an appropriate circuit, before we
              fail it.  (Default: 2 minutes.)

       TestVia nickname,nickname,...
              A list of nodes to prefer for  your  middle  hop  when  building
              testing   circuits.   This   option   is  mainly  for  debugging
              reachability problems.

       TrackHostExits host,.domain,...
              For each value in the  comma  separated  list,  Tor  will  track
              recent connections to hosts that match this value and attempt to
              reuse the same exit node for each. If  the  value  is  prepended
              with  a  ’.’, it is treated as matching an entire domain. If one
              of the values is just a ’.’, it  means  match  everything.  This
              option  is  useful  if you frequently connect to sites that will
              expire all your authentication cookies (ie log you out) if  your
              IP  address  changes.  Note  that  this  option  does  have  the
              disadvantage of making it more clear that  a  given  history  is
              associated  with  a  single user. However, most people who would
              wish to observe this will observe it through  cookies  or  other
              protocol-specific means anyhow.

       TrackHostExitsExpire NUM
              Since exit servers go up and down, it is desirable to expire the
              association between host and exit server after NUM seconds.  The
              default is 1800 seconds (30 minutes).

       UseEntryGuards 0|1
              If  this  option  is  set  to  1,  we pick a few long-term entry
              servers, and try to stick with them.  This is desirable  because
              constantly changing servers increases the odds that an adversary
              who owns some servers will observe a  fraction  of  your  paths.
              (Defaults to 1.)

       NumEntryGuards NUM
              If  UseEntryGuards  is  set to 1, we will try to pick a total of
              NUM routers as long-term entries for our circuits.  (Defaults to
              3.)

       SafeSocks 0|1
              When  this  option  is  enabled,  Tor  will  reject  application
              connections that use unsafe variants of the  socks  protocol  --
              ones that only provide an IP address, meaning the application is
              doing a DNS resolve first.  Specifically, these are  socks4  and
              socks5 when not doing remote DNS.  (Defaults to 0.)

       TestSocks 0|1
              When  this  option  is enabled, Tor will make a notice-level log
              entry for each connection to the Socks port  indicating  whether
              the  request  used  a  safe socks protocol or an unsafe one (see
              above entry on SafeSocks).  This helps to determine  whether  an
              application   using   Tor  is  possibly  leaking  DNS  requests.
              (Default: 0)

       VirtualAddrNetwork Address/bits
              When a controller asks for a virtual (unused) address  with  the
              MAPADDRESS  command,  Tor  picks an unassigned address from this
              range.  (Default: 127.192.0.0/10)

              When providing proxy server service to a  network  of  computers
              using   a  tool  like  dns-proxy-tor,  change  this  address  to
              "10.192.0.0/10"     or     "172.16.0.0/12".      The     default
              VirtualAddrNetwork   address  range  on  a  properly  configured
              machine will route to the loopback interface.  For local use, no
              change to the default VirtualAddrNetwork setting is needed.

       AllowNonRFC953Hostnames 0|1
              When  this  option  is disabled, Tor blocks hostnames containing
              illegal characters (like @ and :) rather than sending them to an
              exit  node  to be resolved.  This helps trap accidental attempts
              to resolve URLs and so on.  (Default: 0)

       FastFirstHopPK 0|1
              When this option is enabled and we aren’t running as  a  server,
              Tor  skips  the  public  key  step for the first hop of creating
              circuits.  This is safe  since  we  have  already  used  TLS  to
              authenticate  the  server  and to establish forward-secure keys.
              Turning  this  option  off  makes   circuit   building   slower.
              (Default: 1)

       TransPort PORT
              If  non-zero,  enables  transparent  proxy  support  on PORT (by
              convention, 9040).  Requires OS support for transparent proxies,
              such as BSDs’ pf or Linux’s IPTables.  If you’re planning to use
              Tor as a transparent proxy for a network, you’ll want to examine
              and  change  VirtualAddrNetwork from the default setting. You’ll
              also want to set the TransListenAddress option for  the  network
              you’d like to proxy.  (Default: 0).

       TransListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind   to   this   address   to  listen  for  transparent  proxy
              connections.   (Default:  127.0.0.1).   This   is   useful   for
              exporting a transparent proxy server to an entire network.

       NATDPort PORT
              Allow  old  versions  of  ipfw  (as  included in old versions of
              FreeBSD, etc.) to send connections through Tor  using  the  NATD
              protocol.   This  option  is  only  for  people  who  cannot use
              TransPort.

       NATDListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind to this address to listen for NATD connections.   (Default:
              127.0.0.1).

       SERVER OPTIONS

       The  following  options are useful only for servers (that is, if ORPort
       is non-zero):

       Address address
              The IP or fqdn of this  server  (e.g.  moria.mit.edu).  You  can
              leave this unset, and Tor will guess your IP.

       AssumeReachable 0|1
              This option is used when bootstrapping a new Tor network. If set
              to 1, don’t  do  self-reachability  testing;  just  upload  your
              server descriptor immediately. If AuthoritativeDirectory is also
              set, this  option  instructs  the  dirserver  to  bypass  remote
              reachability  testing  too  and  list  all  connected servers as
              running.

       ContactInfo email_address
              Administrative contact information for server. This  line  might
              get picked up by spam harvesters, so you may want to obscure the
              fact that it’s an email address.

       ExitPolicy policy,policy,...
              Set an exit policy for this server. Each policy is of  the  form
              "accept|reject  ADDR[/MASK][:PORT]".   If  /MASK is omitted then
              this policy just applies to the host given.  Instead of giving a
              host  or  network  you  can  also use "*" to denote the universe
              (0.0.0.0/0).  PORT can be a single port number, an  interval  of
              ports  "FROM_PORT-TO_PORT",  or  "*".   If PORT is omitted, that
              means "*".

              For  example,  "accept  18.7.22.69:*,reject  18.0.0.0/8:*,accept
              *:*"  would  reject  any  traffic  destined  for  MIT except for
              web.mit.edu, and accept anything else.

              To specify  all  internal  and  link-local  networks  (including
              0.0.0.0/8,    169.254.0.0/16,    127.0.0.0/8,    192.168.0.0/16,
              10.0.0.0/8, and 172.16.0.0/12), you can use the "private"  alias
              instead  of an address.  These addresses are rejected by default
              (at the beginning of your exit policy), along with  your  public
              IP  address,  unless  you set the ExitPolicyRejectPrivate config
              option to 0. For example, once you’ve done that, you could allow
              HTTP  to  127.0.0.1  and block all other connections to internal
              networks with  "accept  127.0.0.1:80,reject  private:*",  though
              that  may  also  allow connections to your own computer that are
              addressed to its public (external) IP address. See RFC 1918  and
              RFC 3330 for more details about internal and reserved IP address
              space.

              This directive can be specified multiple times so you don’t have
              to put it all on one line.

              Policies are considered first to last, and the first match wins.
              If you want to _replace_ the default exit policy, end your  exit
              policy  with  either  a  reject *:* or an accept *:*. Otherwise,
              you’re _augmenting_ (prepending to) the default exit policy. The
              default exit policy is:
                   reject *:25
                   reject *:119
                   reject *:135-139
                   reject *:445
                   reject *:465
                   reject *:563
                   reject *:587
                   reject *:1214
                   reject *:4661-4666
                   reject *:6346-6429
                   reject *:6699
                   reject *:6881-6999
                   accept *:*

       ExitPolicyRejectPrivate 0|1
              Reject  all private (local) networks, along with your own public
              IP address, at the beginning of  your  exit  policy.  See  above
              entry on ExitPolicy. (Default: 1)

       MaxOnionsPending NUM
              If  you  have  more  than  this  number of onionskins queued for
              decrypt, reject new ones. (Default: 100)

       MyFamily nickname,nickname,...
              Declare that this Tor server is controlled or administered by  a
              group  or organization identical or similar to that of the other
              named servers.  When two servers both declare that they  are  in
              the  same  ’family’,  Tor  clients will not use them in the same
              circuit.  (Each server only needs to list the other  servers  in
              its  family; it doesn’t need to list itself, but it won’t hurt.)

       Nickname name
              Set the server’s nickname to ’name’. Nicknames must be between 1
              and   19   characters  inclusive,  and  must  contain  only  the
              characters [a-zA-Z0-9].

       NumCPUs num
              How many processes to use at  once  for  decrypting  onionskins.
              (Default: 1)

       ORPort PORT
              Advertise  this  port to listen for connections from Tor clients
              and servers.

       ORListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind to this IP address  to  listen  for  connections  from  Tor
              clients  and  servers.  If you specify a port, bind to this port
              rather than the one specified in ORPort. (Default: 0.0.0.0) This
              directive  can  be  specified multiple times to bind to multiple
              addresses/ports.

       PublishServerDescriptor 0|1
              If set to 0, Tor will act as a server  if  you  have  an  ORPort
              defined,   but  it  will  not  publish  its  descriptor  to  the
              dirservers. This option is useful if  you’re  testing  out  your
              server,  or  if  you’re  using  a  Tor  controller  that handles
              directory publishing for you.  (Default: 1)

       RedirectExit pattern target
              Whenever an outgoing connection tries to connect  to  one  of  a
              given set of addresses, connect to target (an address:port pair)
              instead.  The address pattern is given in the same format as for
              an  exit  policy.   The  address  translation applies after exit
              policies are applied.   Multiple  RedirectExit  options  can  be
              used: once any one has matched successfully, no subsequent rules
              are considered.  You can specify that no redirection  is  to  be
              performed  on  a  given  set  of  addresses by using the special
              target string "pass", which prevents subsequent rules from being
              considered.

       ShutdownWaitLength NUM
              When we get a SIGINT and we’re a server, we begin shutting down:
              we close listeners and start refusing new  circuits.  After  NUM
              seconds,   we   exit.  If  we  get  a  second  SIGINT,  we  exit
              immediately.  (Default: 30 seconds)

       AccountingMax N bytes|KB|MB|GB|TB
              Never send more than the specified number of bytes  in  a  given
              accounting  period,  or  receive  more  than  that number in the
              period.  For example, with AccountingMax set to 1 GB,  a  server
              could  send  900  MB and receive 800 MB and continue running. It
              will only hibernate once one of the two reaches 1 GB.  When  the
              number of bytes is exhausted, Tor will hibernate until some time
              in the next accounting period.   To  prevent  all  servers  from
              waking at the same time, Tor will also wait until a random point
              in each period before waking up.  If  you  have  bandwidth  cost
              issues,  enabling  hibernation  is  preferable  to setting a low
              bandwidth, since it provides users with  a  collection  of  fast
              servers  that are up some of the time, which is more useful than
              a set of slow servers that are always "available".

       AccountingStart day|week|month [day] HH:MM
              Specify how long accounting periods last.  If  month  is  given,
              each accounting period runs from the time HH:MM on the dayth day
              of one month to the same day and time of  the  next.   (The  day
              must  be  between  1 and 28.)  If week is given, each accounting
              period runs from the time HH:MM of the dayth day of one week  to
              the same day and time of the next week, with Monday as day 1 and
              Sunday as day 7.  If day is given, each accounting  period  runs
              from  the  time HH:MM each day to the same time on the next day.
              All times are local, and given in 24-hour  time.   (Defaults  to
              "month 1 0:00".)

       ServerDNSResolvConfFile filename
              Overrides  the  default DNS configuration with the configuration
              in filename.  The file format is the same as the  standard  Unix
              "resolv.conf"  file  (7).  This option, like all other ServerDNS
              options, only affects name  lookup  that  your  server  does  on
              behalf  of clients.  Also, it only takes effect if Tor was built
              with  eventdns  support.   (Defaults  to  use  the  system   DNS
              configuration.)

       ServerDNSSearchDomains 0|1
              If  set  to  1,  then  we will search for addresses in the local
              search domain.  For example, if this  system  is  configured  to
              believe it is in "example.com", and a client tries to connect to
              "www", the client will be connected to "www.example.com".   This
              option  only affects name lookup that your server does on behalf
              of clients, and only takes effect if Tor was build with eventdns
              support.  (Defaults to "0".)

       ServerDNSDetectHijacking 0|1
              When  this  option  is  set  to  1, we will test periodically to
              determine whether our local nameservers have been configured  to
              hijack  failing  DNS  requests (usually to an advertising site).
              If they are, we will attempt to correct this.  This option  only
              affects  name lookup that your server does on behalf of clients,
              and only takes effect if Tor was build  with  eventdns  support.
              (Defaults to "1".)

       ServerDNSTestAddresses address,address,...
              When  we’re  detecting DNS hijacking, make sure that these valid
              addresses aren’t getting redirected.  If they are, then our  DNS
              is  completely  useless,  and  we’ll  reset  our  exit policy to
              "reject *:*".  This option only affects name  lookup  that  your
              server  does  on behalf of clients, and only takes effect if Tor
              was build with eventdns support.  (Defaults to  "www.google.com,
              www.mit.edu, www.yahoo.com, www.slashdot.org".)

       ServerDNSAllowNonRFC953Hostnames 0|1
              When  this  option  is  disabled,  Tor  does  not try to resolve
              hostnames containing illegal characters (like @  and  :)  rather
              than  sending  them  to an exit node to be resolved.  This helps
              trap accidental attempts to resolve URLs and so on.  This option
              only  affects  name  lookup  that  your server does on behalf of
              clients, and only takes effect if Tor was  build  with  eventdns
              support.  (Default: 0)

DIRECTORY SERVER OPTIONS

       The  following  options are useful only for directory servers (that is,
       if DirPort is non-zero):

       AuthoritativeDirectory 0|1
              When this option is set to 1, Tor operates as  an  authoritative
              directory   server.    Instead  of  caching  the  directory,  it
              generates its own list of good servers, signs it, and sends that
              to the clients.  Unless the clients already have you listed as a
              trusted directory, you probably do not want to set this  option.
              Please coordinate with the other admins at tor-ops@freehaven.net
              if you think you should be a directory.

       V1AuthoritativeDirectory 0|1
              When this option is set in addition  to  AuthoritativeDirectory,
              Tor  also generates a version 1 directory (for Tor clients up to
              0.1.0.x).   (As  of  Tor  0.1.1.12  every   (v2)   authoritative
              directory still provides most of the v1 directory functionality,
              even without this option set to 1.  This however is expected  to
              change in the future.)

       VersioningAuthoritativeDirectory 0|1
              When  this  option  is  set  to 1, Tor adds information on which
              versions of Tor are still believed safe for use to the published
              directory.    Each   version  1  authority  is  automatically  a
              versioning authority; version 2 authorities provide this service
              optionally.  See RecommendedVersions, RecommendedClientVersions,
              and RecommendedServerVersions.

       NamingAuthoritativeDirectory 0|1
              When this option is set to 1, then the server advertises that it
              has  opinions  about  nickname-to-fingerprint bindings.  It will
              include these opinions in its published network-status pages, by
              listing  servers  with  the  flag  "Named"  if a correct binding
              between that nickname and fingerprint has been  registered  with
              the  dirserver.   Naming  dirservers  will  refuse  to accept or
              publish descriptors that contradict a registered  binding.   See
              approved-routers in the FILES section below.

       HSAuthoritativeDir 0|1
              When  this  option is set in addition to AuthoritativeDirectory,
              Tor  also  accepts  and  serves  hidden   service   descriptors.
              (Default: 0)

       DirPort PORT
              Advertise the directory service on this port.

       DirListenAddress IP[:PORT]
              Bind  the  directory  service  to this address. If you specify a
              port, bind to  this  port  rather  than  the  one  specified  in
              DirPort.  (Default:  0.0.0.0)  This  directive  can be specified
              multiple times to bind to multiple addresses/ports.

       DirPolicy policy,policy,...
              Set an entrance policy for this server, to limit who can connect
              to the directory ports.  The policies have the same form as exit
              policies above.

       RecommendedVersions STRING
              STRING is a  comma-separated  list  of  Tor  versions  currently
              believed to be safe. The list is included in each directory, and
              nodes which pull down the directory learn whether they  need  to
              upgrade.  This option can appear multiple times: the values from
              multiple lines are spliced together.   When  this  is  set  then
              VersioningAuthoritativeDirectory should be set too.

       RecommendedClientVersions STRING
              STRING  is  a  comma-separated  list  of  Tor versions currently
              believed to be safe for clients to  use.   This  information  is
              included  in version 2 directories.  If this is not set then the
              value of RecommendedVersions is used.  When  this  is  set  then
              VersioningAuthoritativeDirectory should be set too.

       RecommendedServerVersions STRING
              STRING  is  a  comma-separated  list  of  Tor versions currently
              believed to be safe for servers to  use.   This  information  is
              included  in version 2 directories.  If this is not set then the
              value of RecommendedVersions is used.  When  this  is  set  then
              VersioningAuthoritativeDirectory should be set too.

       DirAllowPrivateAddresses 0|1
              If  set  to 1, Tor will accept router descriptors with arbitrary
              "Address" elements. Otherwise, if the address is not an IP or is
              a  private IP, it will reject the router descriptor. Defaults to
              0.

       AuthDirBadExit AddressPattern...
              Authoritative directories only.  A set of address  patterns  for
              servers  that  will be listed as bad exits in any network status
              document this authority  publishes,  if  AuthDirListBadExits  is
              set.

       AuthDirInvalid AddressPattern...
              Authoritative  directories  only.  A set of address patterns for
              servers that will never be listed  as  "valid"  in  any  network
              status document that this authority publishes.

       AuthDirReject AddressPattern...
              Authoritative  directories  only.  A set of address patterns for
              servers that will never be listed at all in any  network  status
              document  that  this  authority  publishes, or accepted as an OR
              address in any descriptor  submitted  for  publication  by  this
              authority.

       AuthDirListBadExits 0|1
              Authoritative directories only.  If set to 1, this directory has
              some opinion about which nodes are  unsuitable  as  exit  nodes.
              (Do  not  set  this  to 1 unless you plan to list nonfunctioning
              exits as bad; otherwise, you are effectively voting in favor  of
              every declared exit as an exit.)

       AuthDirRejectUnlisted 0|1
              Authoritative  directories  only.   If  set  to 1, the directory
              server rejects  all  uploaded  server  descriptors  that  aren’t
              explicitly  listed  in  the  fingerprints  file.  This acts as a
              "panic button" if we get Sybiled. (Default: 0)

HIDDEN SERVICE OPTIONS

       The following options are used to configure a hidden service.

       HiddenServiceDir DIRECTORY
              Store data files for  a  hidden  service  in  DIRECTORY.   Every
              hidden service must have a separate directory.  You may use this
              option multiple times to specify multiple services.

       HiddenServicePort VIRTPORT [TARGET]
              Configure a virtual port VIRTPORT for a hidden service.  You may
              use this option multiple times; each time applies to the service
              using the most recent hiddenservicedir.  By default, this option
              maps  the  virtual  port to the same port on 127.0.0.1.  You may
              override the target port,  address,  or  both  by  specifying  a
              target of addr, port, or addr:port.

       HiddenServiceNodes nickname,nickname,...
              If  possible, use the specified nodes as introduction points for
              the hidden service. If this is left unset, Tor will be smart and
              pick some reasonable ones; most people can leave this unset.

       HiddenServiceExcludeNodes nickname,nickname,...
              Do  not  use  the specified nodes as introduction points for the
              hidden service. In normal use there is no reason to set this.

       PublishHidServDescriptors 0|1
              If set to 0, Tor will run any hidden services you configure, but
              it won’t advertise them to the rendezvous directory. This option
              is only useful if you’re using a  Tor  controller  that  handles
              hidserv publishing for you.  (Default: 1)

       RendPostPeriod N seconds|minutes|hours|days|weeks
              Every  time  the  specified  period  elapses,  Tor  uploads  any
              rendezvous service descriptors to the directory  servers.   This
              information  is also uploaded whenever it changes.  (Default: 20
              minutes)

SIGNALS

       Tor catches the following signals:

       SIGTERM
              Tor will catch this, clean up and sync to disk if necessary, and
              exit.

       SIGINT Tor  clients  behave  as with SIGTERM; but Tor servers will do a
              controlled slow  shutdown,  closing  listeners  and  waiting  30
              seconds  before  exiting.  (The delay can be configured with the
              ShutdownWaitLength config option.)

       SIGHUP The signal instructs Tor to reload its configuration  (including
              closing and reopening logs), fetch a new directory, and kill and
              restart its helper processes if applicable.

       SIGUSR1
              Log statistics about current connections, past connections,  and
              throughput.

       SIGUSR2
              Switch  all  logs  to loglevel debug. You can go back to the old
              loglevels by sending a SIGHUP.

       SIGCHLD
              Tor receives this signal when one of its  helper  processes  has
              exited, so it can clean up.

       SIGPIPE
              Tor catches this signal and ignores it.

       SIGXFSZ
              If  this signal exists on your platform, Tor catches and ignores
              it.

FILES

       /etc/tor/torrc
              The configuration file, which contains "option value" pairs.

       /var/lib/tor/
              The tor process stores keys and other data here.

       DataDirectory/cached-status/*
              The most recently downloaded network status  document  for  each
              authority.  Each file holds one such document; the filenames are
              the hexadecimal  identity  key  fingerprints  of  the  directory
              authorities.

       DataDirectory/cached-routers and cached-routers.new
              These  files  hold downloaded router statuses.  Some routers may
              appear more than  once;  if  so,  the  most  recently  published
              descriptor  is used.  The ".new" file is an append-only journal;
              when it gets too large,  all  entries  are  merged  into  a  new
              cached-routers file.

       DataDirectory/state
              A set of persistent key-value mappings.  These are documented in
              the file.  These include:
            - The current entry guards and their status.
            - The current bandwidth accounting  values  (unused  so  far;  see
            below).
            - When the file was last written
            - What version of Tor generated the state file
            - A short history of bandwidth usage, as produced  in  the  router
            descriptors.

       DataDirectory/bw_accounting
              Used to track bandwidth  accounting  values  (when  the  current
              period  starts  and  ends; how much has been read and written so
              far this period).  This file is obsolete, and the  data  is  now
              stored  in  the  ’state’ file as well.  Only used when bandwidth
              accounting is enabled.

       DataDirectory/control_auth_cookie
              Used for cookie authentication with the controller.  Regenerated
              on  startup.   See control-spec.txt for details.  Only used when
              cookie authentication is enabled.

       DataDirectory/keys/*
              Only used by servers.  Holds identity keys and onion keys.

       DataDirectory/fingerprint
              Only used by servers.  Holds the  fingerprint  of  the  server’s
              identity key.

       DataDirectory/approved-routers
              Only   for   naming   authoritative   directory   servers   (see
              NamingAuthoritativeDirectory).   This  file  lists  nickname  to
              identity bindings.  Each line lists a nickname and a fingerprint
              separated by whitespace.   See  your  fingerprint  file  in  the
              DataDirectory  for  an example line.  If the nickname is !reject
              then descriptors  from  the  given  identity  (fingerprint)  are
              rejected  by this server. If it is !invalid then descriptors are
              accepted but marked in the directory as not valid, that is,  not
              recommended.

       HiddenServiceDirectory/hostname
              The  <base32-encoded-fingerprint>.onion  domain  name  for  this
              hidden service.

       HiddenServiceDirectory/private_key
              The private key for this hidden service.

SEE ALSO

       privoxy(1), tsocks(1), torify(1)

       https://www.torproject.org/

BUGS

       Plenty, probably. Tor is still in development. Please report them.

AUTHORS

       Roger Dingledine <arma@mit.edu>, Nick Mathewson <nickm@alum.mit.edu>.
09/28/12

HUGE Security Resource

HUGE Security Resource+ – version 6000 – 08/31/2012

(Security + Trimmings!)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_cryptanalysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_fingerprint

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_Persistent_Threat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent_handling

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent_provocateur

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircrack-ng

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymizer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_remailer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARP_poisoning

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARP_spoofing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arpwatch

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_signal_processing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Packet_Reporting_System

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backdoor_%28computing%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behavioral_targeting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bioacoustics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BitTorrent_protocol_encryption

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_operation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_propaganda

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_site

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluebugging

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluejacking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluesnarfing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BrainGate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Activism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Activism_by_method

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Amateur_radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:American_spies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:American_whistleblowers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Analysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Applications_of_cryptography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Applied_ethics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Automatic_identification_and_data_capture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Barcodes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:BitTorrent

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Black_projects

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Bluetooth

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Books_about_the_Central_Intelligence_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Branches_of_psychology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Central_Intelligence_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Central_Intelligence_Agency_operations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Christianity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Christian_terms

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Civil_disobedience

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Codecs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Code_names

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:COINTELPRO_targets

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Communication_of_falsehoods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computational_linguistics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computational_statistics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_file_formats

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_networking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_network_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_security_exploits

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_security_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Computer_security_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Concepts_in_ethics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Confidence_tricks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Conspiracy_theories

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Counter-intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Counter-terrorism

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Counter-terrorist_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Covert_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Critical_thinking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Crowd_psychology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cryptanalytic_devices

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cryptanalytic_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cryptographic_attacks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cryptographic_hardware

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cryptography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cybercrime

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cyberwarfare

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Data_collection

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Data_compression

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Data_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Data_transmission

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Deception

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Denial-of-service_attacks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Digital_signal_processing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Diversionary_tactics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Electronic_test_equipment

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Electronic_warfare

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Encodings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Encryption_devices

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Espionage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Espionage_devices

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Espionage_projects

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Espionage_techniques

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Etiquette

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:File_sharing_networks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Gambling_terminology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Hacking_%28computer_security%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Historians_of_the_Central_Intelligence_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:History_of_radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:History_of_telecommunications

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:History_of_the_Internet

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Injection_exploits

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intelligence_%28information_gathering%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intelligence_agencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intelligence_agencies_by_country

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intelligence_analysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Intelligence_operations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:International_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Interrogation_techniques

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Law_enforcement

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Law_enforcement_equipment

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Law_enforcement_techniques

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Law_enforcement_terminology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Linux_security_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Malware

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mass_surveillance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Media_manipulation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Metaphysics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Microscopy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_communications

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_operations_by_type

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_organization

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_psychiatry

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_science

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Military_technology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Mind_control

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Morse_code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:National_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:National_Security_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:National_Security_Agency_encryption_devices

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Network_addressing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Network_architecture

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Network_management

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Neuropsychology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Neuroscience

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Non-fiction_books_about_espionage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Non-military_counter-terrorist_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Nonverbal_communication

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Operations_involving_special_forces

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Organized_crime

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Packet_radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Paramilitary_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:People_of_the_Central_Intelligence_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Perimeter_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Persuasion_techniques

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Philosophical_concepts

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Philosophical_methodology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Philosophy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Philosophy_of_language

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Privacy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Privacy_of_telecommunications

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Problem_solving

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Propaganda

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Propaganda_in_the_United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Propaganda_techniques

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Psychiatric_treatments

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Psychological_manipulation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Psychological_warfare

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Public-key_cryptography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Quantized_radio_modulation_modes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Religious_philosophy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Researchers_of_the_John_F._Kennedy_assassination

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Research_methods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Rootkits

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Secrecy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Secret_broadcasting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Secret_government_programs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Secret_military_programs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Security_companies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Signals_intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Signals_intelligence_agencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Social_engineering_(computer_security)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Solid-state_computer_storage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Spies_by_role

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Statistical_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Steganography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Surveillance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Survival_skills

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Telecommunications

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Telegraphy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Theology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:United_States_Department_of_Defense_agencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:United_States_government_secrecy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Video_hosting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Warfare_by_type

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Whistleblowers_by_nationality

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Wireless_networking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Works_about_espionage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Intelligence_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaffing_and_winnowing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christianity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_Committee

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIA_influence_on_public_opinion

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens%27_Commission_to_Investigate_the_FBI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_Rule_Book

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clandestine_operation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cointelpro

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_boot_attack

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_for_Law_Enforcement_Act

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_BitTorrent_clients

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_download_managers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_portable_media_players

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_video_hosting_services

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_VoIP_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CompStat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_and_Internet_Protocol_Address_Verifier

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_insecurity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_surveillance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confidence_trick

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consensus_reality

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covert_operation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptographic_hash_function

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cut-out_%28espionage%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CyanogenMod

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygwin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_acquisition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_remanence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_packet_inspection

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehumidifier

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deluge_%28software%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_signal_processing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_signature

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_traces

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNS_spoofing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctrine_of_mental_reservation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECHELON

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_measurements

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_interference

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_pulse

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_radiation_and_health

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_shielding

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromagnetic_spectrum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_signature

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMF_measurement

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Espionage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executable_and_Linkable_Format

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploit_%28computer_science%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_Jewels_%28Central_Intelligence_Agency%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_Fourier_Transform

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forensic_linguistics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_information

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_information_legislation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_speech_zone

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency_analysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency_counter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusion_center

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Webb

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gutmann_method

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-frequency_direction_finding

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honeypot_%28computing%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Host_protected_area

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosts_file

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Htaccess

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_tunnel_(software)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I2P

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11i-2004

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IMSI-catcher

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_visualization

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_wants_to_be_free

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrasound

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intelligence_collection_management

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Spy_Museum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_protocol_suite

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran-Contra_Affair

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_assassination_conspiracy_theories

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_nullification

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_microphone

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_malware

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_CB_slang

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_codecs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_con_artists

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_confidence_tricks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_conspiracies_%28political%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counterintelligence_organizations

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Failed_States_Index

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_criminal_enterprises,_gangs_and_syndicates

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defunct_intelligence_agencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_information_graphics_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_intelligence_agencies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_intelligence_gathering_disciplines

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_international_common_standards

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Linux_computer_viruses

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_numerical_analysis_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_TCP_and_UDP_port_numbers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_video_hosting_services

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAC_address

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_Lantern_%28software%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Md5

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measuring_receiver

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_manipulation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microexpression

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mind_control

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitrokhin_Archive

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_rules

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_acoustics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_cognition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Cryptologic_Museum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Agency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonverbal_communication

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_station

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenBSD_Journal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenID

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Mockingbird

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Northwoods

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_RAFTER

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_microscope

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organizationally_Unique_Identifier

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSSEC

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packet_radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palantir_Technologies

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paralanguage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patriot_Act

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perl

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phishing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pod_slurping

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Police_code#The_Hundred_Code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_forwarding

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_analysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_ARTICHOKE

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Chatter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MINARET

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKDELTA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKNAOMI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKUltra

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Shamrock

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psikhushka

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_manipulation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_Operations_%28United_States%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QBittorrent

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QR_Code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_direction_finder

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality_mining

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_squad

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reid_technique

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rogue_DHCP

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_641A

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rootkit

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopolamine#Use_in_interrogation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrambler

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Communication

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_computing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_digital_card

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_telephone

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_engineering

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismology

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SheevaPlug

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shellcode

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shill

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortwave

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shred_%28Unix%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_channel_attack

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signal_analysis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silent_speech_interface

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simulated_reality

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situation_awareness

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartdust

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snarfing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sneakernet

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_Defined_Radio

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_patent_debate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_synthesis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sousveillance

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectral_leakage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectral_music

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrogram

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrometer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectrum_analyzer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Split_tunneling

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spycatcher

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spymaster

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Srm_%28Unix%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_prison_experiment

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STASI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steganography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stenomask

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_light_interference_phenomenon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subvocal_recognition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sysctl

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_tapping

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempest_%28codename%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten-code

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_CIA_and_the_Cult_of_Intelligence

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_COINTELPRO_Papers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_insulation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ThinThread

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throat_microphone

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timing_attack

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin_foil_hat

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_%28anonymity_network%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tradecraft

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trailblazer_Project

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_%28BitTorrent_client%29

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TrapWire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trusted_computing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truth_drug

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_government_security_breaches

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Eck_phreaking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Very_low_frequency

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Marchetti

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_private_network

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voice_procedure

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_ad-hoc_network

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_mesh_network

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_security

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Write_amplification

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Writeprint

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WWV_%28radio_station%29#Standard_frequency_signals

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahweh

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z_code

 

—————————————-

 

** 6001: Suggested Books:

 

– CLOAK & CORKSCREW: Where CIA Meets Hollywood

– For the President’s Eyes Only: Secret Intelligence and the American Presidency from Washington to Bush

– Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World’s Stolen Treasures

– Radio Frequency Interference: How to Find It and Fix It

– SAS Survival Handbook, Revised Edition: For Any Climate, in Any Situation

– Spycatcher – by Peter Wright

– The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography

– Under and Alone: The True Story of the Undercover Agent Who Infiltrated America’s Most Violent Outlaw Motorcycle Gang

 

—————————————-

 

** 6002: Articles, Guides, How To’s:

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

+ (MS Kinect Spy System): http://www.pgpboard.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=691

+ (MS Kinect Spy System / Article mirrors): http://pastesite.com/41388 , http://paste.lisp.org/display/131227

+

+ (Spies at MS? / Snippet): http://www.pgpboard.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=702

+ (Spies at MS? / Full Article): http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/security/375169/could-us-cyberspies-have-moles-inside-microsoft

+ (Spies at MS? / Discussion): http://it.slashdot.org/story/12/06/15/1614219/us-security-services-may-have-moles-within-microsoft-says-researcher

+

+ (links, tons of) http://www.loyola.edu/departments/academics/political-science/strategic-intelligence/index.html

+

http://aboba.drizzlehosting.com/IEEE/

http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/projects/guide/

http://all.net/books/document/harvard.html

http://all.net/journal/50/crypt.html

http://all.net/journal/50/cybercop.html

http://all.net/journal/50/ecommerce.html

http://all.net/journal/50/firewall.html

http://all.net/journal/deception/index.html

http://all.net/journal/ntb/index.html

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/blowing-away-bloatware-a-guide-to-reinstalling-windows-on-a-new-pc/

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/07/freeing-your-router-from-ciscos-anti-porn-pro-copyright-cloud-service/

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/02/black-ops-how-hbgary-wrote-backdoors-and-rootkits-for-the-government.ars/

http://arstechnica.com/uncategorized/2007/10/p2p-researchers-use-a-blocklist-or-you-will-be-tracked-100-of-the-time/

http://asm.sourceforge.net/

http://blog.bodhizazen.net/linux/ubuntu-how-to-faillog/

http://blog.spoofed.org/2007/12/openbsd-on-soekris-cheaters-guide.html

http://blog.webroot.com/2011/09/13/mebromi-the-first-bios-rootkit-in-the-wild/

http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/risks

http://citp.princeton.edu/research/memory/

http://crunchbanglinux.org/wiki/configuring_the_openbox_menu

http://cryptogon.com/?p=624

http://cryptogon.com/?p=877

http://cryptome.org/0002/siss.htm

http://cryptome.org/0005/cia-iqt-spies.htm

http://cryptome.org/0005/tor-opsec.htm

http://cryptome.org/0006/nsa-17-docs.htm

http://cryptome.org/2012/07/gent-forum-spies.htm

http://cryptome.org/2012/08/tor-exits-usg-funds-02.htm

http://cryptome.org/cisco-vile.txt

http://cryptome.org/isp-spy/online-spying.htm

http://cryptome.org/nsa-tempest.htm

http://cryptome.org/nsa-vaneck.htm

http://cryptome.org/tempest-law.htm

http://cwe.mitre.org/top25/

http://debian-handbook.info/browse/stable/

http://digitalcorpora.org/

http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/software-os/w/microsoft_os/3316.2-1-microsoft-windows-7-official-iso-download-links-digital-river.aspx

http://forums.radioreference.com/

http://freehaven.net/anonbib/topic.html#Anonymous_20communication

http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/08/10/20/1248234/compromising-wired-keyboards

http://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player/kb/disable-local-shared-objects-flash.html

http://it.slashdot.org/story/02/03/09/199242/crt-eavesdropping-optical-tempest

http://it.slashdot.org/story/09/03/12/2038213/researchers-sniff-keystrokes-from-thin-air-wires

http://it.slashdot.org/story/09/07/12/0259246/stealing-data-via-electrical-outlet

http://joernfranz.net/2011/01/20/installing-ubuntu-10-10-with-full-disk-encryption/

http://lanl.arxiv.org/

http://lasecwww.epfl.ch/keyboard/

http://lifehacker.com/205090/geek-to-live–set-up-a-personal-home-ssh-server?tag=softwarehomeserver

http://lifehacker.com/237227/geek-to-live–encrypt-your-web-browsing-session-with-an-ssh-socks-proxy?tag=softwaressh

http://linuxpoison.blogspot.com/2009/06/how-to-disable-loading-of-unnecessary.html

http://log.nadim.cc/?p=78

http://mnin.org/ (Twitter: https://twitter.com/iMHLv2)

http://news.cnet.com/2010-1071-997528.html?tag=fd_nc_1 (Archived: http://pastebin.com/nHZzQyB9)

http://packetlife.net/library/cheat-sheets/

http://pastebin.com/E1YbqUMV

http://pastebin.com/JdkqxBAa

http://pastebin.com/mr5WT30M

http://pastebin.com/Qf2jHhAb

http://pastebin.com/TRXkVJ2k

http://pastebin.com/utY08tLT

http://pastebin.com/YEbM3Brv

http://people.csail.mit.edu/rivest/crypto-security.html

http://people.howstuffworks.com/individual-privacy-channel.htm

http://people.howstuffworks.com/wiretapping1.htm

http://pgp.mit.edu/

http://projects.gnome.org/gdm/docs/2.14/configuration.html?pagewanted=all

http://projects.wsj.com/surveillance-catalog/

http://research.google.com/pubs/papers.html

http://research.google.com/pubs/SecurityCryptographyandPrivacy.html

https://ccrma.stanford.edu/papers

http://security-sh3ll.blogspot.com/search/label/Papers

https://events.ccc.de/congress/2005/static/p/r/o/Category~Projects_1780.html

https://events.ccc.de/congress/2005/static/r/f/i/RFID-Zapper%28EN%29_77f3.html

https://isc.sans.edu/port.html

http://slashdot.org/story/01/01/16/139244/NSA-Reveals-Some-Tempest-Information

https://live.gnome.org/GDM/2.22/Configuration

https://memset.wordpress.com/2011/11/26/syscall-hijacking-openbsd/

http://srg.cs.illinois.edu/srg/biblio

https://secure.dslreports.com/forum/r27289884-Forensic-Cheat-Sheet

https://torrentfreak.com/stop-downloading-fakes-and-junk-torrents-071204/

https://w2.eff.org/Privacy/printers/docucolor/

https://www.cia.gov/library/center-for-the-study-of-intelligence/csi-publications/csi-studies/index.html

https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/emsec/optical-faq.html

https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/emsec/softtempest-faq.html

https://www.defcon.org/html/links/book-list.html

https://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/legal/index

https://www.eff.org/issues/printers

https://www.eff.org/pages/list-printers-which-do-or-do-not-display-tracking-dots

https://www.eff.org/testyourisp

https://www.eff.org/wp/blog-safely

https://www.eff.org/wp/detecting-packet-injection

https://www.eff.org/wp/how-not-get-sued-file-sharing/

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/

https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/why-free.html

https://www.iana.org/assignments/service-names-port-numbers/service-names-port-numbers.xml

https://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2002/11/23/14927/477

https://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2004/10/26/02313/946

https://www.net-security.org/articles_main.php

https://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/070909-electrical-data-theft.html

https://www.pcworld.com/article/248995/how_to_install_windows_7_without_the_disc.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2005/09/snooping_on_tex.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/09/anonymity_and_t_1.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/11/hushmail_turns.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/maninthemiddle.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2009/04/identifying_peo.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/01/web_security.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/05/detecting_brows.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/09/real-time_nsa_e.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/12/tor_routers.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/03/detecting_words.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/03/identifying_tor.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/08/identifying_peo_2.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/09/identifying_spe.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/09/tor_arms_race.html

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2012/07/how_to_become_a_1.html

https://www.schneier.com/essay-182.html

https://www.schneier.com/essay-261.html

https://www.schneier.com/essay-262.html

https://www.usenix.org/publications/proceedings

http://techgurulive.com/2008/09/15/how-to-monitor-and-be-informed-of-ip-address-changes-from-your-network/

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/99/07/19/1324207/super-shielded-pc-cases

http://virus.bartolich.at/virus-writing-HOWTO/_html/index.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20040608141549/http://all.net/journal/netsec/1997-12.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20060220113124/http://www.dss.mil/training/salinks.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20080222191230/http://the.jhu.edu/upe/2004/03/23/about-van-eck-phreaking/

http://web.archive.org/web/20080820112134/http://www.crash-override.net/bogusdns.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20090210035245/http://danieldegraaf.afraid.org/info/ipv6

http://web.archive.org/web/20100916111512/http://www.ibiblio.org/security/articles/ports.html

http://web.mit.edu/gtmarx/www/iron.html

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/camera-sees-around-corners-0321.html

http://wiki.wireshark.org/Security

http://www.ac6v.com/frequencies.htm

http://www.afterdawn.com/guides/

http://www.au.af.mil/info-ops/perception.htm

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/tutorials/

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/wiki/

http://www.binarywolf.com/

http://www.binarywolf.com/249/

http://www.catb.org/jargon/

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/GLOSSARY.HTM

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/RADELECT/LITES/LEDLITES.HTM

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/RADELECT/LITES/LITESFAQ.HTM

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/RADELECT/LITES/LITESHOT.HTM

http://www.ciphersbyritter.com/RADELECT/LITES/XMSLITES.HTM

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/solutions/ns340/ns414/ns742/ns744/landing_safe.html

http://www.crypto.com/papers/

http://www.cryptome.org/0002/nsa-tempest-01.zip

http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/

http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/secure_del.html

http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~tromer/acoustic/

http://www.cs.wright.edu/~pmateti/InternetSecurity/Lectures/Top/index.html

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/linux-multi-boot.html

http://www.developer.nokia.com/Community/Wiki/Category:Open_Source

http://www.developer.nokia.com/Community/Wiki/Nokia_Open_Source

http://www.dhra.mil/perserec/adr.html

http://www.dhra.mil/perserec/products.html

http://www.domenech.org/homebrew-sdr/receiver-1.htm

http://www.ehow.com/how_8242473_display-ip-addresses-network.html

http://www.engadget.com/2005/11/15/how-to-build-a-wifi-biquad-dish-antenna/

http://www.epanorama.net/documents/telecom/telephone_intercom.html

http://www.ethicalhacker.net/content/view/22/2/

http://www.exploit-db.com/papers/

http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/XDMCP-HOWTO.html

http://www.febo.com/pages/baudline/

http://www.febo.com/time-freq/FMT/technique/index.html

http://www.forensicswiki.org/

http://www.garykessler.net/library/fsc_stego.html

http://www.gnupg.org/

http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/~acquisti/research.htm

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc2/

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc3/

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc/index.html

http://www.ieee-security.org/cipher.html

http://www.ieee-security.org/TC/SP-Index.html

http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v09/v09p305_Marchetti.html

http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=23463&rll=1

http://www.itworld.com/security/64193/researchers-find-ways-sniff-keystrokes-thin-air

http://www.l0t3k.org/programming/docs/reverse/

http://www.linux-sec.net/Firewall/HowTo/ja.net.private.html

http://www.macromedia.com/support/documentation/en/flashplayer/help/settings_manager03.html

http://www.madboa.com/geek/dig/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/gpg-quickstart/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/openssl/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/openssl/#digest-file

http://www.madboa.com/geek/pine-ssl/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/soho-bind/

http://www.neilgunton.com/doc/index.html?o=1&doc_id=8580

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/934274-freeware-alternative-list/

http://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/five_stages.html

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/

http://www.openrce.org/articles/

http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/weblog/view/wlg/448

http://www.oreillynet.com/topics/wireless/802.11

http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=62&id=6

http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=66&id=11#article

http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=66&id=15#article

http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=66&id=7#article

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-07/seeing-through-walls-wireless-router

http://www.radioreference.com/

http://www.rfidvirus.org/index.html

http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/442/2

http://www.securityfocus.com/news/11372

http://www.social-engineer.org/framework/Social_Engineering_Framework

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/forensic-analysis-live-linux-system-pt-1

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/forensic-analysis-live-linux-system-pt-2

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/ip-spoofing-introduction

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/reverse-engineering-hostile-code

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/sebek-3-tracking-attackers-part-one

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/sebek-3-tracking-attackers-part-two

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/social-engineering-fundamentals-part-i-hacker-tactics

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/social-engineering-fundamentals-part-ii-combat-strategies

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/wireless-forensics-tapping-air-part-one

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/wireless-forensics-tapping-air-part-two

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/11/multi_platform_backdoor/

http://www.tuxradar.com/content/learn-hack/

http://www.vanwensveen.nl/rants/microsoft/IhateMS.html

http://www.wiley.com/legacy/compbooks/mcnamara/links.html

http://www.williamson-labs.com/laser-mic.htm

http://www.zurich.ibm.com/security/idemix/

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/99/10/25/2039238/declassified-tempest-material-comes-online

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/99/11/08/093250/coming-to-a-desktop-near-you-tempest-capabilities

(PDF, EPUB, MOBI, leads to) http://debian-handbook.info/get/now/

(PDF) ftp://ftp.tapr.org/software_lib/ether/Ham_Ethernet_GBPPR.pdf

(PDF) http://ai.eller.arizona.edu/COPLINK/publications/CACM_From%20Fingerprint%20to%20Writeprint.pdf

(PDF) http://cryptome.org/2012/06/ci-glossary.pdf

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-59/SP800-59.pdf

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-84/SP800-84.pdf

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-92/SP800-92.pdf

(PDF) http://lanl.arxiv.org/pdf/1004.1267v1

(PDF) http://lanl.arxiv.org/pdf/1109.0597v2

(PDF) http://lanl.arxiv.org/pdf/1110.5395v3

(PDF) http://lanl.arxiv.org/pdf/1204.0447v1

(PDF) http://lanl.arxiv.org/pdf/1208.2877v1

(PDF) http://packetstormsecurity.org/filedesc/Practical_Onion_Hacking.pdf.html

(PDF) http://packetstormsecurity.org/files/65944/tempest.pdf

(PDF) http://srgsec.cs.uiuc.edu/bootjacker.pdf

(PDF) http://srgsec.cs.uiuc.edu/cloaker.pdf

(PDF) http://sunnyday.mit.edu/book2.pdf

(PDF) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/%7Emgk25/ieee02-optical.pdf

(PDF) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ih98-tempest.pdf

(PDF) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/pet2004-fpd.pdf

(PDF) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.pdf

(PDF) https://www.eff.org/sites/default/files/packet_injection_0.pdf

(PDF) https://www.usenix.org/events/sec09/tech/full_papers/sec09_attacks.pdf

(PDF) http://vulnfactory.org/research/defcon-remote.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ches2005-limits.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ieee02-optical.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ih98-tempest.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ih99-stegfs.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/pet2004-fpd.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.pdf

(PDF) http://www.crysys.hu/skywiper/skywiper.pdf

(PDF) http://www.cs.wright.edu/%7Epmateti/InternetSecurity/Lectures/TCPexploits/sec-tcpip.pdf

(PDF) http://www.fas.org/irp/eprint/nsa-interview.pdf

(PDF) http://www.governmentattic.org/2docs/Hist_US_COMSEC_Boak_NSA_1973.pdf

(PDF) http://www.medienwissenschaft.hu-berlin.de/medientheorien/forschung/downloads/hausarbeiten/em-sniffer.pdf

(PDF) http://www.rfidvirus.org/papers/percom.06.pdf

(PDF) http://www.toucan-system.com/research/blackhat2012_brossard_hardware_backdooring.pdf

(PDF) http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/%7Edfrankow/files/lam-etrics2006-security.pdf

(PDF) http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/%7Edfrankow/files/privacy-sigir2006.pdf

(PDF, leads to)

(PDF, leads to a) http://about-threats.trendmicro.com/ebooks/are-you-protecting-the-data-packets-in-your-pocket/

(PDF, leads to a) http://ojs.academypublisher.com/index.php/jnw/article/view/jnw0702259266

(PDF, leads to a) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.html

(PDF, leads to a) https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity12/feasibility-side-channel-attacks-brain-computer-interfaces

(PDF, leads to a) http://ubuntu-manual.org/downloads

(PDF, leads to) http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2006-09/stop-dropped-calls

(PDF, leads to) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/techreports/UCAM-CL-TR-577.html

(PDF, leads to) http://wikileaks.org/wiki/Cryptome.org_takedown:_Microsoft_Global_Criminal_Compliance_Handbook,_24_Feb_2010

(PDF, PS, leads to) http://cacr.uwaterloo.ca/hac/

(PDF, PS, PPT, DOC, TXT, leads to) http://www.cs.washington.edu/education/courses/csep590/06wi/

(PDFs, leads to) http://all.net/Analyst/index.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://reality.media.mit.edu/publications.php

(PDFs, leads to) https://citizenlab.org/2012/07/from-bahrain-with-love-finfishers-spy-kit-exposed/3/

(PDFs, leads to) http://srgsec.cs.illinois.edu/Welcome.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://sunnyday.mit.edu/

(PDFs, leads to) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/

(PDFs, leads to) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/publications.html

(PDFs, leads to) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/research/security/publications/

(PDFs, leads to) https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://web.archive.org/web/20071228064639/http://www.computer.org/portal/site/csdl/index.jsp

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/faqs.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.navsea.navy.mil/nswc/dahlgren/Leading%20Edge/default.aspx

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.pgpi.org/doc/guide/

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.raulsiles.com/en/Research.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~dfrankow/pubs.htm

(PDFs, PS, leads to) http://hd.media.mit.edu/TechnicalReportsList.html

(PDFs, PS, leads to) https://wwws.cs.umn.edu/tech_reports_upload/

(PDFs, PSs, BibTeX, leads to) http://www.freehaven.net/anonbib/

recon.cx – (Various Media Formats, leads to) http://2005.recon.cx/recon2005/papers/

recon.cx – (Various Media Formats, leads to) http://2006.recon.cx/en/f/

recon.cx – (Various Media Formats, leads to) http://recon.cx/2008/speakers.html

recon.cx – (Various Media Formats, leads to) http://recon.cx/2010/speakers.html

recon.cx – (Various Media Formats, leads to) http://recon.cx/2012/schedule/index.en.html

recon.cx – (Videos, leads to               ) http://archive.org/details/RECON2008

recon.cx – (Videos, leads to               ) http://archive.org/search.php?query=%22recon%202011%22

recon.cx – (Videos, leads to               ) http://archive.org/search.php?query=recon%202005%20AND%20mediatype%3Amovies

recon.cx – (Videos, leads to               ) http://archive.org/search.php?query=recon%202006%20AND%20mediatype%3Amovies

recon.cx – (Videos, leads to               ) http://archive.org/search.php?query=recon%202012%20AND%20mediatype%3Amovies

(various document formats, leads to) http://www.grouplens.org/biblio

(various types of media, links to) https://www.defcon.org/html/links/defcon-media-archives.html

(videos, leads to) http://web.media.mit.edu/~sandy/videos.html

—————————————-

 

** 6003: Antivirus LiveCDs – boot and scan your system for malware

 

+ AVG:

http://www.avg.com/us-en/avg-rescue-cd-download

 

+ AVG ARL: The latest release version of the AVG Rescue CD GNU/Linux (ARL) with daily updated virus database,

latest alpha or beta version of the ARL and all the resources needed to build the ARL from scratch.

Releases are signed!

https://share.avg.com/arl

 

+ Avira:

https://www.avira.com/en/download/product/avira-antivir-rescue-system

 

+ BitDefender:

http://download.bitdefender.com/rescue_cd/

 

+ Comodo Rescue Disk (CRD):

https://www.comodo.com/business-security/network-protection/rescue-disk.php

 

+ Dr.Web LiveCD & LiveUSB:

http://www.freedrweb.com/livecd/

http://www.freedrweb.com/liveusb/

 

+ F-Secure:

https://www.f-secure.com/en/web/labs_global/removal-tools/-/carousel/view/142

https://www.f-secure.com/en/web/labs_global/removal-tools

 

+ Kaspersky:

http://support.kaspersky.com/faq/?qid=208282173

http://support.kaspersky.com/viruses/rescuedisk?level=2

http://forum.kaspersky.com/index.php?showforum=159

 

+ Microsoft Windows Defender Offline:

https://connect.microsoft.com/systemsweeper

 

—————————————-

 

** 6004: Random Links

(In a future version these links will each have their own new sections,)

(since we’ve moved beyond mere security related links! As such, many of these links are not security oriented)

(This section may appear now to be one big random blob of links, but with our next version, there will spring)

(up several new sections of which these will be filed into. We wanted to push this out as a preview of how)

(we’re expanding beyond security links.)

 

+ Tormail Hidden Service (Requires Tor in order to use):

+ Tor Mail @Hidden Service: http://jhiwjjlqpyawmpjx.onion/

+ Tor Mail Intro @Clearnet: http://www.tormail.org/

#

# (large resource) http://blockyourid.com/~gbpprorg/

# (large resource) http://blockyourid.com/~gbpprorg/mil/

# http://blockyourid.com/~gbpprorg/mil/vaneck/index.html

# (large resource) http://www.qsl.net/n9zia/

# mirrors: http://www.gbppr.org , http://projects1.gbppr.org/ , http://gbppr.dyndns.org/

#

+ Acoustic Surveillance of Physically Unmodified PCs by Michael LeMay and Jack Tan

+ (PDF) (original but broken link) http://seclab.uiuc.edu/pubs/LeMayT06.pdf

+ (PDF) (found but haven’t verified source) http://blockyourid.com/~gbpprorg/mil/vaneck/LeMayT06.pdf

+

(archive) http://mympxplayer.org/

http://10minutemail.com

http://4hv.org/e107_plugins/forum/forum.php

http://500px.com/

http://500px.com/MarcinSobas

http://ai.bpa.arizona.edu/

http://alphabetizer.flap.tv/

http://amecisco.com/

http://anythingbutipod.com/

http://anythingbutipod.com/forum/

http://applefritter.com/

http://applefritter.com/forum

http://archive.org/create/

http://archive.org/details/bittorrent

http://arstechnica.com/

http://arstechnica.com/civis/

http://artsandlettersdaily.com/

http://arxiv.org/

http://ask.metafilter.com/

http://askubuntu.com/

http://attrition.org/

http://attrition.org/mirror/

http://batteryuniversity.com/

http://betanews.com/

http://bibliodyssey.blogspot.com/

http://biosbits.org/

http://blog.bodhizazen.net/

http://blog.makezine.com/

http://blogs.amd.com/

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/

http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux/steamd-penguins/

http://boingboing.net/

http://boston.com/bigpicture/

http://browserspy.dk/

http://busybox.net/

http://cdburnerxp.se/

http://centralops.net/co/

http://classical-music-online.net/

http://commons.wikimedia.org/

http://consumerist.com/

http://cubesat.calpoly.edu/

http://cwe.mitre.org/

http://cybernetnews.com/

http://cygwin.com/

http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/index.php

http://dedoimedo.com/

http://depositfiles.com/

http://digg.com/

http://diit.sourceforge.net/

http://distrowatch.com/

http://dmml.asu.edu/resources

http://documentaryheaven.com/

http://doihaveadeadpixel.com/

http://drudgereport.com/

http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Portal:Main

http://en.rsf.org/

http://fab.cba.mit.edu/

http://faststone.org/

http://faxzero.com/

http://fcw.com/Home.aspx

http://filecrop.com/

http://forum.crucial.com/

http://forum.japantoday.com/

http://forum.notebookreview.com/

http://forums.anandtech.com/

http://forums.computeractive.co.uk/

http://forums.fedoraforum.org/

http://forums.linuxmint.com

http://forums.overclockers.com.au

http://forums.techarena.in/

http://forums.wi-fiplanet.com/

http://freeculture.org/

http://fsi-language-courses.org

http://gizmodo.com/

http://glassgiant.com/ascii/

http://gonullyourself.com/

http://groupmedia.media.mit.edu/

http://hardocp.com/

http://hd.media.mit.edu/

http://hintsforums.macworld.com/

http://howtogrowtobacco.com/forum/

http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Main_Page

http://html.adobe.com/

http://imakeprojects.com/Projects/wifi-heartbeat/

http://imgur.com/

http://improveverywhere.com/

http://info.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/Z.Kalal/tld.html

http://ip-check.info

http://issihosts.com/haveged/

http://jesus-is-savior.com/

http://lanl.arxiv.org/

http://la-samhna.de/library/rootkits/detect.html

http://leakdirectory.org/index.php/Leak_Site_Directory

http://lifehacker.com/

http://linuxmanpages.com/

http://linuxmint.com/

http://linuxpoison.blogspot.com/

http://linuxscrew.com/

http://mail.yandex.com/

http://memegenerator.net/

http://mentalfloss.com/

http://meta.wikimedia.org/

http://mindjustice.org/

http://mitnicksecurity.com/

http://multiupload.nl/

http://mybannermaker.com/

http://mympx.org/

http://narus.com/

http://naturalnews.com/

http://news.cnet.com/

http://news.cnet.com/cheapskate/

http://news.cnet.com/tech-blogs/

http://news.netcraft.com/

http://nmap-online.com/

http://online.wsj.com/

http://onpointtactical.com/

http://onstrat.com/osint/#startingpoints

http://oreilly.com/blogs/

http://oyc.yale.edu/

http://packetstormsecurity.org/

http://pastebin.com/KNtCVkpN

http://patriotmemory.com/

http://pdos.csail.mit.edu/~baford/vm/

http://people.csail.mit.edu/mrub/vidmag/

http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/L.Wood/constellations/index.html

http://photomuse.org/

http://pipl.com/

http://portforward.com/

http://preyproject.com/

http://project-byzantium.org/

http://projects.washingtonpost.com/top-secret-america/

http://qubes-os.org/

http://rense.com/

http://rfidguardian.org/

http://rootzwiki.com/

http://samate.nist.gov/index.php/Source_Code_Security_Analyzers.html

https://blog.mozilla.org/

https://blog.mozilla.org/addons/

https://blog.mozilla.org/beyond-the-code/

https://blog.mozilla.org/bhearsum/

https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/author/chrismozillacom/

https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/category/firefox/

https://blog.mozilla.org/calendar/

https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/

https://blog.mozilla.org/gen/

https://blog.mozilla.org/it/

https://blog.mozilla.org/labs/

https://blog.mozilla.org/ligong/

https://blog.mozilla.org/mobile/

https://blog.mozilla.org/nnethercote/

https://blog.mozilla.org/privacy/

https://blog.mozilla.org/services/

https://blog.mozilla.org/theden/

https://blog.mozilla.org/thunderbird/

https://blog.mozilla.org/tilt/

https://blog.mozilla.org/webdev/

https://blog.mozilla.org/website-archive/

http://schizophrenia.com/

http://sclipo.com/

https://code.google.com/p/corkami/

https://code.google.com/p/googlecl/

https://community.rapid7.com/community/infosec/blog/2012/08/08/finfisher

https://creativecommons.org/

http://screenshots.debian.net/

http://searchengineland.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bing_Mobile#Bing_411

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_PDF_software

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

https://epic.org/

https://epic.org/privacy/tools.html

https://fedoraproject.org/

https://freedom-to-tinker.com/

https://github.com/djrbliss/rose-exploit

http://slashdot.org/

http://slickdeals.net/

https://lists.apple.com/mailman/listinfo/security-announce

https://mashable.com/

https://one.ubuntu.com/services/

http://soundcloud.com/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/diit/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/nfienfcollector/

https://panopticlick.eff.org/

http://species.wikimedia.org/

http://spectrum.ieee.org/

http://spectrum.ieee.org/blogs

http://spectrum.ieee.org/blog/tech-talk

http://spectrum.mit.edu/articles/normal/fab-lab/ (article)

https://personaltelco.net/wiki

http://spywareinfoforum.com/

https://s3.amazonaws.com/data.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxyvchLFXx1r1ylbfo1_500.jpg

https://secure.dslreports.com/faq

http://stallman.org/

https://torrentfreak.com/

https://twitter.com/corkami

http://support.ntp.org/bin/view/Support/WebHome

http://swann.com

https://www.amnesty.org/

https://www.blackhat.com/index.html

https://www.ccc.de/

https://www.cert.org/

https://www.chillingeffects.org/

https://www.commondreams.org/

https://www.computerworld.com/

https://www.defcon.org/

https://www.defcon.org/html/links/dc-tools.html

https://www.eff.org/

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/

https://www.eff.org/pages/switzerland-network-testing-tool

https://www.erowid.org/

https://www.flickr.com/

https://www.grc.com

https://www.imagineshop.co.uk/

https://www.infoworld.com/

https://www.libreoffice.org/

https://www.linuxquestions.org/

https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/

https://www.mi5.gov.uk/

https://www.microsoft.com/communities/forums/default.mspx

https://www.microsoft.com/security/scanner/en-us/default.aspx

https://www.myspace.com/

https://www.networkworld.com/

https://www.npr.org/blogs/health/

https://www.opendns.com/technology/dnscrypt/

https://www.propublica.org/

https://www.safe-mail.net/

https://www.sans.org/

https://www.technologyreview.com/computing/

https://www.un.org/

https://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml

https://www.youtube.com/

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Randy+Quaid+Star+Whackers

https://www.youtube.com/ucberkeley

http://techliberation.com/

http://technorati.com/

http://techreport.com/

http://techreport.com/forums/

http://thebrowser.com/

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/

http://totse2.com/

http://trapkit.de/

http://truth-out.org/

http://turnoffyourtv.com/

http://tutvid.com

http://ubuntuforums.org/

http://urlget.sourceforge.net/

http://usahitman.com/

http://vigilantcitizen.com/

http://vigilantcitizen.com/vcboards/

http://web.archive.org/web/20040202004210/http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/links.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20040206214035/http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/links/archives.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20060831063210/http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/reform.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20060831063224/http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/data.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20060831081811/http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/thnktank.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20070207050215/http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/sources.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20070217052232/http://faculty.ncwc.edu/TOConnor/427/427links.htm

http://webcast.berkeley.edu/

http://web.media.mit.edu/~sandy/

http://web.mit.edu/mitei/news/index.html

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/

http://web.mit.edu/zacka/www/midas.html

http://web.mit.edu/zacka/www/projects.html

http://wificamera.propositions.org.uk/

http://wificamera.propositions.org.uk/Panoramic-Wifi-Camera

http://wiki.echelon2.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://wikitravel.org/

http://wisp.wikispaces.com

http://www1.informatik.uni-erlangen.de/tresor

http://www.4shared.com/

http://www.5min.com/

http://www.academicearth.org/

http://www.aclu.org/

http://www.addictivetips.com/

http://www.allmyfaves.com/

http://www.anandtech.com/

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-ndex.htm

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-port.htm

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-ref.htm

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-thkg.htm

http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/awc-thkg.htm#critical

http://www.avforums.com/forums/

http://www.bashoneliners.com/

http://www.bbb.org/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/radio

http://www.betabeat.com/

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/worldwide/

http://www.bluesnews.com/

http://www.brainpickings.org/

http://www.brickhousesecurity.com/

http://www.brokentoaster.com/butterflymp3/index.html

http://www.bugmenot.com/

http://www.businessweek.com/

http://www.buzzfeed.com/

http://www.cbradiotalk.com/index.php

http://www.cerias.purdue.edu/

http://www.chromium.org/

http://www.cicentre.com/

http://www.codecademy.com/

http://www.complaints.com/

http://www.consumerworld.org/

http://www.copyscape.com/

http://www.coreboot.org/

http://www.coreboot.org/SeaBIOS

http://www.cosmolearning.com/

http://www.cracked.com/

http://www.crucial.com

http://www.cryptome.org/

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/videoLibrary/

http://www.cultdeadcow.com/

http://www.cyberciti.biz/

http://www.dafont.com/

http://www.dailymotion.com/

http://www.damninteresting.com/

http://www.defectivebydesign.org/

http://www.differencebetween.net/

http://www.digital-detective.co.uk/

http://www.digital-digest.com/index.php

http://www.disclose.tv/

http://www.disclose.tv/forum/

http://www.discoverbing.com/mobile

http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/

http://www.dmoz.org/Computers/Internet/E-mail/Spam/Preventing/Temporary_Addresses/

http://www.dogbitelaw.com/

http://www.doom9.org/

http://www.downforeveryoneorjustme.com/

http://www.economist.com/

http://www.ehow.com/

http://www.emaildiscussions.com/

http://www.endangeredlanguages.com/

http://www.engadget.com

http://www.engadget.com/

http://www.epanorama.net/index2.php?section=documents&index=audio

http://www.evga.com/forums/

http://www.ew.com/ew/

http://www.eweek.com/

http://www.extremetech.com/

http://www.fabathome.org/

http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/

http://www.fark.com/

http://www.filestube.com/

http://www.folkstreams.net/

http://www.forbes.com/

http://www.freerepublic.com

http://www.freesoftwaremagazine.com/

http://www.ft.com/

http://www.gamefront.com/

http://www.gameinformer.com/

http://www.geekstogo.com/forum/

http://www.giveawayoftheday.com/

http://www.gizmag.com/

http://www.godlikeproductions.com

http://www.groklaw.net/

http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/

http://www.hackermedia.org/

http://www.head-fi.org/f/

http://www.hellomagazine.com/

http://www.hitb.org/

http://www.howcast.com/

http://www.howstuffworks.com/

http://www.hulu.com/

http://www.i2p2.de/

http://www.ibiblio.org/

http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071360/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0120660/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0128278/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0308808/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0489037/

http://www.inchem.org/

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/

http://www.informationweek.com/

http://www.infowars.com/

http://www.internetnews.com/

http://www.inventgeek.com/blog/

http://www.irfanview.com/

http://www.itworld.com/

http://www.itworld.com/blogs/sandra-henry-stocker

http://www.japantoday.com/

http://www.jjtc.com/Security/stegtools.htm

http://www.jjtc.com/Steganography/

http://www.khanacademy.org/

http://www.ladyada.net/make/

http://www.ladyada.net/make/mintyboost/index.html

http://www.ladyada.net/make/minty/index.html

http://www.last.fm/

http://www.linuxfoundation.org/

http://www.lipstickalley.com/

http://www.liveleak.com/

http://www.mail-archive.com/

http://www.mcgrewsecurity.com/tools/msramdmp/

http://www.mediafire.com/

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

http://www.metafilter.com/

http://www.minutemanproject.com/

http://www.myfishtank.net/forum/

http://www.nasdaq.com/

http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org

http://www.nationmaster.com/

http://www.neowin.net/

http://www.neowin.net/forum/

http://www.net.princeton.edu/software/dhcp_probe/

http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/tech-beat (archives:) http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/tech-beat/archives.cfm

http://www.nutsvolts.com/

http://www.nutsvolts.com/index.php?/blog/

http://www.officer.com/

http://www.ok.co.uk/home/

http://www.okmagazine.com/

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/

http://www.opcva.com/watchdog/

http://www.openculture.com/

http://www.openrightsgroup.org/

http://www.openstreetmap.org/

http://www.opentopia.com/hiddencam.php

http://www.open-video.org/

http://www.osnews.com/

http://www.patriotmemory.com/forums

http://www.pbs.org/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/

http://www.people.com/people/

http://www.phonescoop.com/

http://www.phoronix.com/

http://www.phoronix.com/forums/

http://www.pool.ntp.org/en/

http://www.princeton.edu/WebMedia/lectures/

http://www.printfriendly.com/

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

http://www.quora.com/

http://www.qwiki.com/

http://www.radaronline.com/

http://www.raspberrypi.org/

http://www.readprint.com/

http://www.reddit.com/

http://www.reuters.com/

http://www.rollingstone.com/

http://www.rootkit.nl/projects/lynis.html

http://www.rssweather.com

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=hackers-can-steal-from-reflections

http://www.seabios.org/SeaBIOS

http://www.seattle.intel-research.net/wisp/

http://www.shacknews.com/

http://www.sigsac.org/

http://www.slashfilm.com/

http://www.slashgear.com/

http://www.songkick.com/

http://www.soyouwanna.com/

http://www.spamhaus.org/

http://www.spychips.com/

http://www.stallman.org/

http://www.stallman.org/archives/

http://www.sutree.com/

http://www.synchtube.com/

http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_toc.htm

http://www.techdirt.com/

http://www.technologyreview.com/

http://www.tech-recipes.com/

http://www.techspot.com/

http://www.techsupportforum.com/

http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/

http://www.ted.com/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/

http://www.theverge.com/

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/

http://www.thoughtcrime.org/software/sslsniff/

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

http://www.tmz.com/

http://www.tomshardware.com/index.html

http://www.tuxradar.com/

http://www.tvguide.com/

http://www.ubuntu.com/

http://www.urbandictionary.com/

http://www.usbwifi.orconhosting.net.nz/

http://www.ustream.tv/

http://www.vanityfair.com/

http://www.variety.com/Home/

http://www.videojug.com/

http://www.vidipedia.org/

http://www.wardriving.com/

http://www.warriorsofthe.net/index.html

http://www.weather.com/

http://www.webcitation.org/

http://www.wi-fiplanet.com/

http://www.wikibooks.org/

http://www.wikihow.com/Main-Page

http://www.wikileaks.org/

http://www.wikinews.org/

http://www.wikipedia.org/

http://www.wikiquote.org/

http://www.wikisource.org/

http://www.wikiversity.org/

http://www.wiktionary.org/

http://www.winsupersite.com/

http://www.winsupersite.com/blogcontent/supersite-blog-39

http://www.wired.com/

http://www.wired.com/about/blogs

http://www.wireimage.com/

http://www.wotsit.org/

http://www.xnview.com/

http://www.youtube-mp3.org/

http://www.zoklet.net/

http://www.zophar.net/

http://zombiehunters.org/forum/

(magazine) http://www.linuxidentity.com/

(online virus scanner) https://www.virustotal.com/

(online virus scanner) http://virusscan.jotti.org/en

(PDF)  http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistir/7316/NISTIR-7316.pdf

(PDFs, leads to) http://dmml.asu.edu/research/pubs

(PDFs, leads to) http://groupmedia.media.mit.edu/publications.php

(PDFs, leads to) http://hd.media.mit.edu/badges/publications.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://linuxnewmedia.com/Products/Print

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.public.asu.edu/~huanliu/publications.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.public.asu.edu/~huanliu/sbp09/program.html

(PDFs, leads to) http://www.seattle.intel-research.net/pubs.php

(PDFs, PPTs, leads to) http://www.public.asu.edu/~huanliu/sbp08/program.html

(Power Pwn) http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/12/07/22/0335223/the-darpa-funded-power-strip-that-will-hack-your-network

(Power Pwn) http://pwnieexpress.com/

(Power Pwn) http://pwnieexpress.com/blogs/news

(Power Pwn) http://www.zdnet.com/power-pwn-this-darpa-funded-power-strip-will-hack-your-network-7000001331/

(Power Pwn – PDF) http://cryptome.org/2012/07/cbp072312.pdf

(view PDFs online!) http://view.samurajdata.se/

—————————————-

 

** 6005: Security Blogs:

 

#

# Most Powerful Voices in Security Who are the Top 25?

# The Rest of the Top 100 –

# * 100 security guru’s listed with their Twitter pages

# and personal/blog sites: (Sep. 8, 2011) Posted here as one

# link rather than posting around 100 Twitter personal pages.

# http://www.sys-con.com/node/1974029

#

+

+ http://blog.layeredsec.com/ (Archive) – https://twitter.com/brycegalbraith (Author moved to Twitter)

+

+ (archive) https://pinvoke.wordpress.com/

+

+ (archive) http://superantispyware.com/blog/

+

+ (click month at right for archives) https://yorkporc.wordpress.com/

*

* https://wiki.debian.org/FreedomBox

*

+

+ http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://www.malwaredomainlist.com/

+ (via Anonymouse because of ban on Tor exit nodes)

+

+ http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://www.securitywire.com/

+ (via Anonymouse to evade Tor exit node ban)

+

+ (archive) http://www.teamfurry.com/wordpress/

+

+ (archive) http://securityincite.com/blog/mike-rothman

+

+ http://anonymouse.org/cgi-bin/anon-www.cgi/http://robert.penz.name/

+ (via Anonymouse: Tor exit node ban evasion by proxy)

+

http://aconaway.com/

http://anonymous.livelyblog.com/

http://anti-virus-rants.blogspot.com/

http://bgpmon.net/blog/

http://blog.brickhousesecurity.com/

http://blog.c22.cc/

http://blog.clamav.net/

http://blog.commandlinekungfu.com/

http://blog.crysys.hu/

http://blog.cuckoosandbox.org/

http://blog.cyberwar.nl/

http://blog.deepsec.net/

http://blog.didierstevens.com/

http://blog.emsisoft.com/

http://blog.eset.com/

http://blog.fireeye.com/research

http://blog.gerhards.net/

http://blog.ine.com/

http://blog.infosanity.co.uk/

http://blog.ioshints.info/

http://blog.lse.epita.fr/

http://blog.mandiant.com/

http://blog.oxff.net/

http://blog.rootshell.be/

http://blogs.appriver.com/

http://blogs.cisco.com/category/security

http://blog.secureideas.net/

http://blog.security4all.be/

http://blogs.iss.net/

http://blog.snort.org/

http://blogs.pcmag.com/securitywatch/

http://blog.spiderlabs.com/

http://blog.spywareguide.com/

http://blogs.securiteam.com/

http://blog.stopbadware.org/

http://blog.tenablesecurity.com/

http://blog.threatexpert.com/

http://blog.trendmicro.com/

http://blog.tsa.gov/

http://blog.uncommonsensesecurity.com/

http://blog.watchfire.com/wfblog/

http://blog.webroot.com/

http://blog.zoller.lu/

http://blog.zx2c4.com/

http://blog.zynamics.com/

http://brandonjcarroll.com/

http://cansecwest.com/

http://carnal0wnage.attackresearch.com/

http://cerias.purdue.edu/site/blog/author/spaf

http://chargen.matasano.com/

http://chris-intel-corner.blogspot.com/

http://chuvakin.blogspot.com/

http://ciscoiseasy.blogspot.com/

http://coffeetocode.net/

http://community.websense.com/blogs/securitylabs/

http://community.websense.com/blogs/securitylabs/default.aspx

http://computer-forensics.sans.org/blog

http://computer-forensics.sans.org/blog/

http://computer.forensikblog.de/en/

http://comsecllc.blogspot.com/

http://contagiodump.blogspot.com/

http://cryptocomb.org/

http://crypto.stanford.edu/

http://cyb3rcrim3.blogspot.com/

http://cyberspeak.libsyn.com/

http://dankaminsky.com/

http://darkreading.com/

http://daveshackleford.com/

http://ddanchev.blogspot.com/

http://ddos.arbornetworks.com/

http://deadliestwebattacks.com/

http://deepsec.net/

http://dhs-daily-report.blogspot.com/

http://digfor.blogspot.com/

http://digitalforensicsisascience.blogspot.com

http://dshield.org/

http://dvlabs.tippingpoint.com/blog

http://dvlabs.tippingpoint.com/blog/

http://elie.im/blog/

http://emergentchaos.com/

http://erratasec.blogspot.com/

http://etherealmind.com/category/blog/

http://etherealmind.com/category/blog/security/

http://eusecwest.com/

http://evilrouters.net/

http://fasthorizon.blogspot.com/

http://forensicaliente.blogspot.com/

http://forensicfocus.blogspot.com/

http://forensicmethods.com/

http://forensicsfromthesausagefactory.blogspot.com/

http://fraudwar.blogspot.com/

http://fumalwareanalysis.blogspot.com/

http://garwarner.blogspot.com/

http://girlunallocated.blogspot.com

http://gleeda.blogspot.com/

http://googleonlinesecurity.blogspot.com/

http://grandstreamdreams.blogspot.com/

http://gregsowell.com/

http://ha.ckers.org/blog (Archive)

http://hackingcisco.blogspot.com/

http://holisticinfosec.blogspot.com/

http://honeyblog.org/

http://inciweb.org/

http://infolookup.securegossip.com/

http://infosecisland.com/

http://intelnews.org/

http://invisiblethings.org/

http://it-audit.sans.org/blog/

http://jeremiahgrossman.blogspot.com/

http://jessekornblum.livejournal.com/

http://journeyintoir.blogspot.com/

http://justaskweg.com/

http://krebsonsecurity.com/

http://labs.m86security.com/ (Archive)

http://lastwatchdog.com/

http://log.nadim.cc

http://lonesysadmin.net/

http://maliciousattacker.blogspot.com/

http://marienfeldt.com/

http://mnin.org/

http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/

http://netsecurity.about.com/

http://netsecurity.about.com/compute/netsecurity/

http://network-101.blogspot.com/

http://news.cnet.com/security

http://news.hitb.org/

http://news.softpedia.com/cat/Security/

http://news.techworld.com/security/

http://offensivecoder.com/blog/

http://p4r4n0id.com/ (appears to be gone, we’ll see)

http://packetlife.net/blog/

http://packetstormsecurity.org/news/

http://pacsec.jp/

http://paranoia.dubfire.net/ (Home: http://www.dubfire.net/) (Twitter: https://twitter.com/csoghoian)

http://pauldotcom.com/

http://penguininside.blogspot.com/

http://pen-testing.sans.org/blog/

http://philosecurity.org/

http://polarwave.blogspot.com/

http://praetorianprefect.com/

http://pseudo-flaw.net/log/index

http://publicintelligence.net/

http://randomthoughtsofforensics.blogspot.com

http://rdist.root.org/

http://recon.cx

http://resources.infosecinstitute.com/

http://revolutionwifi.blogspot.com/

http://rijmenants.blogspot.com/

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/critical-infrastructure

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/ediscovery

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/fred-stock

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/ira-winkler

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/rsa-conference-blog

https://365.rsaconference.com/blogs/securityreading

https://amtso.wordpress.com/

https://blog.avast.com/

https://blog.mozilla.org/security/

https://blog.opendns.com/

https://blogs.adobe.com/psirt/

https://blogs.mcafee.com/

https://blogs.mcafee.com/mcafee-labs

https://blogs.technet.com/b/sysinternals/

https://blogs.technet.com/mmpc/default.aspx

https://blogs.technet.com/msrc/

https://blog.torproject.org/

https://blog.whitehatsec.com/

https://chainmailcheck.wordpress.com/

https://citizenlab.org/category/news/

https://community.rapid7.com/community/infosec/blog

https://community.rapid7.com/community/metasploit/blog

https://devcentral.f5.com/Home/Blogs/tabid/1082195/Default.aspx

https://devcentral.f5.com/weblogs/macvittie/Default.aspx

http://seclists.org/

http://securityandrisk.blogspot.com/

http://securityblog.verizonbusiness.com/

http://securitybraindump.blogspot.com/

http://security-sh3ll.blogspot.com/

http://securityvulns.com/

http://securosis.com/blog

https://fightinginsecurity.wordpress.com/

https://gregness.wordpress.com/

http://sketchymoose.blogspot.com/

https://memset.wordpress.com/

https://news.ycombinator.com/

http://software-security.sans.org/blog/

http://spectrum.ieee.org/blog/riskfactor

https://psal.cs.drexel.edu/index.php/Main_Page

http://spyblog.org.uk/

https://secunia.com/advisories/

https://ssd.eff.org/

https://techbuddha.wordpress.com/

http://stratsec.blogspot.com/

https://twitter.com/hackinthebox

https://twitter.com/markrussinovich

http://superconductor.voltage.com/

http://swann.com/s/products/newsrelease/

https://www.adobe.com/support/security/

https://www.brandenwilliams.com/blog/

https://www.eff.org/

https://www.grc.com/securitynow.htm

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/topics/

https://www.mozilla.org/security/announce/

https://www.net-security.org/

https://www.sans.org/newsletters/

https://www.sans.org/newsletters/#newsbites

https://www.sans.org/newsletters/#ouch

https://www.sans.org/newsletters/#risk

https://www.schneier.com/

https://www.securelist.com/en/weblog

https://www.trustedsec.com/news-and-events/

https://www.usenix.org/conferences

https://www.veracode.com/blog/

http://taosecurity.blogspot.com/

http://technicalinfodotnet.blogspot.com/

http://thehackernews.com/

http://thehiddenevil.com/

http://theinvisiblethings.blogspot.com/

http://threatpost.com/

http://threatthoughts.com/

http://ticklethewire.com/

http://tk-blog.blogspot.com/

http://toorcon.org/

http://travisgoodspeed.blogspot.com/

http://volatility.tumblr.com/

http://vrt-blog.snort.org/

http://vulnfactory.org/blog/

http://web.archive.org/web/20100528020113/http://milw0rm.com/

http://windowsir.blogspot.com/

http://wordpress.bladeforensics.com/

http://www.acunetix.com/blog/

http://www.afcea.org/signal/signalscape/

http://www.allspammedup.com/

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/blog/

http://www.bigbrotherwatch.org.uk/

http://www.blackbag.nl/

http://www.blindhog.net/

http://www.bunniestudios.com/wordpress/

http://www.businessinsider.com/defense

http://www.businessinsider.com/defense/infosec

http://www.businessinsider.com/warroom

http://www.capnfreedom.com/

http://www.catonmat.net/

http://www.cerias.purdue.edu/site/blog

http://www.cerias.purdue.edu/site/blog/

http://www.cgisecurity.com/

http://www.ciscoarticles.com/

http://www.clerkendweller.com/

http://www.corecom.com/html/wlan.html

http://www.cristoncox.com/

http://www.cryptogon.com/

http://www.cryptome.org/

http://www.cryptosmith.com/

http://www.cyberwarnews.info/

http://www.darknet.org.uk/

http://www.darkreading.com/blog

http://www.devttys0.com/blog/

http://www.educatedguesswork.org/

http://www.ehacking.net/

http://www.emergingthreatspro.com/blog/

http://www.ericjhuber.com/

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/hackers

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/malware

http://www.eweek.com/c/s/Security/

http://www.exploit-db.com/

http://www.exploit-id.com/

http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/

http://www.fas.org/blog/ssp/

http://www.federaltimes.com/

http://www.financialcryptography.com/

http://www.flyingpenguin.com/

http://www.forensic4cast.com/

http://www.forensickb.com/

http://www.forensicswiki.org/

http://www.frontlinesentinel.com/

http://www.f-secure.com/weblog

http://www.gfi.com/blog/

http://www.gfi.com/blog/labs/

http://www.hackaday.com/

http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/~acquisti/shb/participants.htm

http://www.hexacorn.com/blog/

http://www.hexblog.com/

http://www.honeynet.org/

http://www.h-online.com/

http://www.h-online.com/developer/

http://www.h-online.com/open/

http://www.h-online.com/security/

http://www.hotforsecurity.com/

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/security/

http://www.infosecblog.org/

http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/blog/

http://www.insearchoftech.com/

http://www.irongeek.com/

http://www.irongeek.com/

http://www.itstactical.com/

http://www.l0t3k.org/en/

http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/

http://www.lightbluetouchpaper.org/

http://www.links.org/

http://www.liquidmatrix.org/blog/

http://www.lovemytool.com/

http://www.mckeay.net/

http://www.my80211.com/

http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/934274-freeware-alternative-list/

http://www.net-security.org/

http://www.networkworld.com/topics/security.html

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/blog/

http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/blog/?cat=4

http://www.nsa.gov/

http://www.offensivecomputing.net/ (moving to: http://openmalware.org/)

http://www.offensive-security.com/blog/

http://www.officer.com/latest-news

http://www.openrce.org/articles/

http://www.packetstormsecurity.org/

http://www.paranoidprose.com/

http://www.pgpboard.com/

http://www.pinewswire.net/

http://www.policemisconduct.net

http://www.prevx.com/blog.asp

http://www.rationalsurvivability.com/blog/

http://www.reddit.com/r/malware

http://www.reddit.com/r/reverseengineering

http://www.reversinglabs.com/blog

http://www.schneier.com/

http://www.scmagazine.com/the-data-breach-blog/section/1263/

http://www.seclist.us/

http://www.secsocial.com/blog/

http://www.securingthehuman.org/blog/

http://www.securitybsides.com

http://www.securityfocus.com/

http://www.securityfocus.com/archive

http://www.security-ray.com/

http://www.securitytracker.com/

http://www.securityweek.com/

http://www.sensepost.com/blog/

http://www.shellguardians.com/

http://www.shmoo.com/news/

http://www.shmoocon.org/

http://www.skullbox.net/index.php

http://www.social-engineer.org/framework/Social_Engineering_Framework

http://www.standalone-sysadmin.com/blog/

http://www.stratumsecurity.com/company/blog/

http://www.survivalblog.com/

http://www.symantec.com/business/security_response/weblog/

http://www.symantec.com/connect/security/blogs

http://www.sysadminblogs.com/planet/

http://www.sysforensics.org/

http://www.teamshatter.com/

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/security

http://www.thedarkvisitor.com/

http://www.thedigitalstandard.blogspot.com/

http://www.theemailadmin.com/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/best-of-the-blog/

http://www.theintelligencenews.com/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/security/

http://www.thesecuritysamurai.com/

http://www.thetechherald.com/security

http://www.troyhunt.com/

http://www.trusteer.com/blog

http://www.whenisfive.com

http://www.wikileaks.org/

http://www.wired.com/about/blogs/

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/

http://www.wlanpros.com/

http://www.wmarkbrooks.com/

http://www.woodmann.com/forum/blog.php

http://www.wrgross.com/blogs/security/

http://www.wrgross.com/blogs/security/category/openbsd/

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/security/

http://www.zerodayinitiative.com/advisories/published/

http://www.zerodayinitiative.com/advisories/upcoming

(videos, leads to) http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=security/hackingillustrated

 

—————————————-

 

** 6006: Security Forums (Web based Discussion Forums)

 

http://cocoontech.com/forums/

http://forum.bitdefender.com

http://forum.prisonplanet.com

http://forums.avg.com/

http://forums.comodo.com/

http://forums.hak5.org/

http://forums.officer.com/forums/

http://forums.windowsecurity.com

http://glocktalk.com/forums/

http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=781545

http://homecommunity.cisco.com/

http://www.antionline.com/

http://www.ar15.com/forums/

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/forums

http://www.binrev.com/forums/

http://www.defencetalk.com/forums/

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/cleanup

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/scambusters

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/security

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/wsecurity

http://www.hex-rays.com/forum/

http://www.networking-forum.com/

http://www.sherdog.net/forums/

http://www.survivalistboards.com/

http://www.wilderssecurity.com/

http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=242949

http://www.woodmann.com/forum/forum.php

—————————————-

 

** 6007: Security Magazines & Zines

 

http://about-threats.trendmicro.com/ebooks/

http://bsdmag.org/

http://chmag.in/

http://chmag.in/issue/all

http://commons.oreilly.com/wiki/index.php/O%27Reilly_Commons

http://gonullyourself.com/ezines/

http://gonullyourself.com/zine/

http://hakin9.org/

http://linuxformat.com/

http://magazine.hackinthebox.org/

http://magazine.hitb.org/

http://secureviewmag.com/

https://www.net-security.org/insecuremag.php

http://ubuntupocketguide.com/index_main.html

http://www.2600.com/

http://www.admin-magazine.com/

http://www.dwheeler.com/secure-programs/

http://www.linuxpromagazine.com/

http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/

http://www.phrack.com/

http://www.textfiles.com/ (RE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textfiles.com)

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/linux-101-hacks-ebook/

http://www.uninformed.org/

—————————————-

 

** 6008: Linux Anti-Malware Scanners

 

See Also: 6003: Antivirus LiveCDs – boot and scan your system for malware

 

+ Avast:

http://www.avast.com/linux-home-edition

 

+ AVG:

http://free.avg.com/ww-en/download.prd-alf.tpl-stdfull

 

+ Bitdefender:

http://www.bitdefender.com/media/html/en/unicesportal/

http://www.bitdefender.com/business/antivirus-for-unices.html

http://unices.bitdefender.com

http://www.bitdefender.com/support/Bitdefender-for-Linux-manual-updates-224.html

 

++ Bitdefender repos (may be older than version obtainable above via registration & email):

http://download.bitdefender.com/repos/deb/

http://download.bitdefender.com/repos/rpm/

 

+ ClamAV:

http://www.clamav.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/clamav/

 

+ ClamTk is a GUI front-end for ClamAV

http://clamtk.sourceforge.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/clamtk/

 

+ Collage:

http://gtnoise.net/projects/7-anti-censorship/7-collage-defeating-censorship-with-user-generated-content

 

+ Comodo Antivirus for Linux (CAVL):

http://forums.comodo.com/comodo-antivirus-for-linux-cavl/comodo-antivirus-for-linux-cavl-v102398181-is-formally-released-t85030.0.html

http://forums.comodo.com/comodo-antivirus-for-linux-cavl-b275.0/

 

+ Coroner’s Toolkit, The:

http://www.porcupine.org/forensics/tct.html

 

+ F-PROT:

http://www.f-prot.com/download/home_user/download_fplinux.html

 

+ F-PROT FRONT-END: QtFprot is a frontend for FPROT 4.x, a free (for personal use) Linux virus-scanner

http://freecode.com/projects/qtfprot

 

+ F-PROT FRONT-END: XFPROT is a graphical frontend for the F-Prot Antivirus for Linux Small Business Edition.

http://freecode.com/projects/xfprot

http://web.tiscali.it/sharp/xfprot/

 

—————————————-

 

** 6009: Linux Security

————–

* 6009.1: Linux Articles (a few of these aren’t security related and will eventually be moved to a new section):

—————

http://alien.slackbook.org/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=slackware:parentalcontrol

http://ask.slashdot.org/story/05/07/20/1457252/network-intrusion-detection-and-prevention

http://csrc.nist.gov/

http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/PubsSPs.html

http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE_113/opensuse-apps/cha.crypto.html

http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE_113/opensuse-apps/cha.gnome.crypto.html

http://emergingthreats.net/

http://en.gentoo-wiki.com/wiki/HOWTO_Iptables_for_newbies

http://freeworld.thc.org/papers/anonymous-unix.html

http://honeypots.sourceforge.net/modified_script.html

http://it.slashdot.org/story/05/04/19/232230/bastille-adds-reporting-grabs-fed-attention

http://it.slashdot.org/story/06/03/14/1842248/pgp-creators-zfone-encrypts-voip

http://linuxblog.darkduck.com/

http://linuxgazette.net/121/anonymous.html

http://linux-ip.net/html/ether-arp.html

http://linuxpoison.blogspot.com/2008/01/howto-check-disk-drive-for-errors-and.html

http://netwizards.co.uk/installing-tripwire-on-ubuntu/

http://nmap.org/book/osdetect.html

http://nmap.org/book/toc.html

http://ornellas.apanela.com/dokuwiki/pub:firewall_and_adv_routing

http://penguininside.blogspot.se/2009/09/10-panel-dock-applications-for-your.html

http://people.redhat.com/pvrabec/openscap/guide.html

http://planet.netfilter.org/

http://project.honeynet.org/papers/individual/

http://project.honeynet.org/papers/kye.html

http://projects.gnome.org/gdm/docs/2.14/configuration.html

http://psychocats.net/ubuntu/index.php

https://delightlylinux.wordpress.com/

https://delightlylinux.wordpress.com/2012/06/14/secure-delete/

http://securitywatch.eweek.com/rootkits/rootkits_on_a_pci_card.html

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/DocsProject/UsingGpg/CreatingKeys

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_create_and_use_a_Live_CD

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/How_to_create_and_use_Live_USB

https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/JeroenVanMeeuwen/Revisor/FedoraRebrandRemixGuidelines

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/EncryptedPrivateDirectory

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/FileIntegrityAIDE

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/GnuPrivacyGuardHowto

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LinuxLogFiles

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Logwatch

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/StricterDefaults

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikibooks/en/wiki/Grsecurity/Appendix/Grsecurity_and_PaX_Configuration_Options

https://wiki.debian.org/

https://wiki.debian.org/iptables

https://wiki.debian.org/SecureApt

https://wiki.debian.org/SystemAdministration

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BasicSecurity

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BasicSecurity/DidIJustGetOwned

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Features

https://www.cert.org/tech_tips/unix_configuration_guidelines.html

https://www.cs.arizona.edu/stork/packagemanagersecurity/faq.html

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-proc/index.html

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/tutorials/l-lockdown1/

https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/tutorials/l-lockdown2/index.html

https://www.linux.com/

https://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/456149-manage-passwords-encryption-keys-and-more-with-seahorse

https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-security-4/security-references-45261/

https://www.owasp.org

https://www.sans.org/reading_room/

https://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram.html

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/AX25-HOWTO/index.html

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Secure-Programs-HOWTO/buffer-overflow.html

http://tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html

http://trac.secdev.org/scapy/wiki/IdentifyingRogueDHCPServers

http://web.archive.org/web/20040215020827/http://www.linux-mag.com/2003-09/acls_01.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20041031074320/http://sun.soci.niu.edu/~rslade/secgloss.htm

http://web.archive.org/web/20041125131921/http://tips.linux.com/tips/04/11/23/2022252.shtml?tid=100&tid=47&tid=35

http://web.archive.org/web/20041231085409/http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/links.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20050306035558/http://www.spitzner.net/linux.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20060712182215/http://linuxgazette.net/128/saha.html

http://web.archive.org/web/20090109020415/http://www.securityfocus.com/print/infocus/1414

http://web.archive.org/web/20100529035423/http://www.cert.org/current/services_ports.html

http://wiki.centos.org/HowTos/Network/IPTables

http://winhelp2002.mvps.org/hosts.htm

http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~charngda/elf.html

http://www.alwanza.com/howTo/linux/tripwire.html

http://www.bitbull.ch/wiki/index.php/Hacking_Notes

http://www.bitbull.ch/wiki/index.php/Linux_Short_Reference

http://www.brandonhutchinson.com/iptables_fw.html

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/shared_object_injection_1.aspx#brief_elf_str_code1

http://www.cromwell-intl.com/security/intrusion-analysis/

http://www.cryptovirology.com/cryptovfiles/cryptovirologyfaqver1.html#whatiscryptoviralextortion

http://www.cs.arizona.edu/stork/packagemanagersecurity/faq.html

http://www.cs.wright.edu/~pmateti/Courses/233/Labs/OS-on-USB/OSonUSBLabKnoppix671DVD.html

http://www.cs.wright.edu/~pmateti/InternetSecurity/Lectures/BufferOverflow/alephOne.html

http://www.cs.wright.edu/~pmateti/InternetSecurity/Lectures/Fortification/obrien.html

http://www.cs.wright.edu/~pmateti/InternetSecurity/Lectures/Probing/How%20to%20Handle%20Network%20Probes.htm

http://www.cyberciti.biz/

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/add-remove-list-linux-kernel-modules/

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-detect-arp-spoofing-under-unix-or-linux/

http://www.cyberciti.biz/hardware/linux-iotop-simple-top-like-io-monitor/

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/howto-log-user-activity-using-process-accounting.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/iptables-mac-address-filtering.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-iptables-10-how-to-block-common-attack.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-iptables-8-how-to-avoid-spoofing-and-bad-addresses-attack.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-security.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-unix-windows-find-hidden-processes-tcp-udp-ports.html

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/top-linux-monitoring-tools.html

http://www.debianadmin.com/

http://www.debianadmin.com/filesystem-encryption-tools-for-linux.html

http://www.debian-administration.org/

http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/49

http://www.debian.org/doc/

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/securing-debian-howto/

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/securing-debian-howto/ch-sec-services.en.html#s-firewall-setup

http://www.debian.org/events/keysigning

http://www.debuntu.org/intrusion-detection-with-aide

http://www.desktoplinux.com/articles/AT3341468184.html

http://www.desktoplinux.com/articles/AT7966076367.html

http://www.dshield.org/diary.html?storyid=13057

http://www.exploit-db.com/

http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/User-Authentication-HOWTO.html

http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gnupg-user.xml

http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/

http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20030703.html

http://www.hackinglinuxexposed.com/articles/20030709.html

http://www.howtoforge.com/intrusion_detection_base_snort

http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/docs/HOWTO/other-formats/html_single/Disk-Encryption-HOWTO.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-aix-manage-ruby/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix10/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix11/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix12/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix13/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix2.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix3.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix4/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix5.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix6.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix7.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix8/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-speakingunix9/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-spunix_greattools/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/aix/library/au-unix-commandline/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc2/

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc3/

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-keyc/index.html

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-livecdsec/?ca=dgr-lnxw07SecurityLiveCD

http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Security/IPtables_Basics.html

http://www.la-samhna.de/library/rootkits/index.html

http://www.ledge.co.za/software/lpinotes/

http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2011/05/10/how-to-install-ubuntu-11-04-on-an-encrypted-lvm-file-system/

http://www.linuxforums.org/articles/understanding-elf-using-readelf-and-objdump_125.html

http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/

http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch14_:_Linux_Firewalls_Using_iptables

http://www.linuxjournal.com/

http://www.linux.org/

http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/tutorials/4505/1

http://www.linuxsecurity.com

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/content/view/117644/49/

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/content/view/118211/49/

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/content/view/119415/49/

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/docs/colsfaq.html

http://www.livecdlist.com/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/gpg-quickstart/

http://www.madboa.com/geek/openssl/#digest-file

http://www.madboa.com/geek/pine-ssl/

http://www.netfilter.org/documentation/

http://www.novell.com/communities/node/4971/detecting-arp-poisoning-attacks

http://www.phrack.com/issues.html?issue=58&id=7#article

http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=68&id=9#article

http://www.porcupine.org/forensics/column.html

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/minimal

http://www.securityfocus.com/firewalls

http://www.securityfocus.com/ids

http://www.securityfocus.com/incidents

http://www.securityfocus.com/unix

http://www.seifried.org/security/ids/20020107-honeypot-vmware-basics.html

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/alien-autopsy-reverse-engineering-win32-trojans-linux

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/detecting-and-removing-malicious-code

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/detecting-rootkits-and-kernel-level-compromises-linux

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/forensic-analysis-live-linux-system-pt-1

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/forensic-analysis-live-linux-system-pt-2

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/hacker-tools-and-their-signatures-part-three-rootkits

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/hardening-tcpip-stack-syn-attacks

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/host-integrity-monitoring-best-practices-deployment

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/reverse-engineering-hostile-code

http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/sniffers-what-they-are-and-how-protect-yourself

http://www.symantec.com/connect/topics/security/securityfocus

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-things-you-should-do-to-a-new-linux-pc-before-exposing-it-to-the-internet/5987648

http://www.thc.org/

http://www.thc.org/papers/fw-backd.htm

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/03/netstat-command-examples/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/11/50-linux-commands/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/12/50-unix-linux-sysadmin-tutorials/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2011/06/iptables-rules-examples/

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2011/12/linux-performance-monitoring-tools/

http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Encrypted-Root-Filesystem-HOWTO/

http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Linux%2BIPv6-HOWTO/index.html

http://www.tracking-hackers.com/misc/faq.html

http://www.ubuntugeek.com/tools-to-delete-files-securely-in-ubuntu-linux.html

http://www.unixwiz.net/techtips/iguide-crypto-hashes.html

http://www.whenisfive.com/tutorials/tor-polipo-5-minute-install-guide-ubuntu-11-0411-10/

http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/LinuxSecurityTools.html

(multicd script) http://multicd.tuxfamily.org/

(multicd script related) http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1071869

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistir/7316/NISTIR-7316.pdf

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-84/SP800-84.pdf

(PDF) http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-92/SP800-92.pdf

(PDF) http://events.ccc.de/congress/2006/Fahrplan/attachments/1167-SpeakingAnonymously.pdf

(PDF) http://web.archive.org/web/20070717124745/http://www.tldp.org/linuxfocus/English/Archives/lf-2003_01-0278.pdf

(PDF) http://www.linux-magazine.com/issue/01/File_Permissions.pdf

(PDFs) http://www.nsa.gov/ia/mitigation_guidance/security_configuration_guides/operating_systems.shtml

 

——————–

* 6009.2: Linux Security Tools

(the intention here is not to list everything, hence the link to BackTrack which

contains a number of useful tools which could otherwise be linked here.)

——————–

 

++ SecTools.Org: Top 125 Network Security Tools

http://sectools.org/

 

+ AIDE:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/aide/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/aide

http://freecode.com/projects/aide

 

+ AppArmor:

http://wiki.apparmor.net/index.php/Main_Page

http://www.linux-magazine.com/Issues/2006/69/AppArmor-vs.-SELinux

(PDF) http://www.linux-magazine.com/content/download/63096/487061/file/AppArmor_vs_SELinux.pdf

https://lkml.org/lkml/2006/4/19/199

 

+ BackTrack Linux (contains MANY tools)

http://www.backtrack-linux.org/

 

+ Bastille:

http://bastille-linux.sourceforge.net/

 

+ Baudline:

http://www.baudline.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudline

 

+ BleachBit:

http://bleachbit.sourceforge.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/bleachbit/

 

+ BotHunter:

http://www.bothunter.net/

 

+ Cacti

http://www.cacti.net/

 

+ Chkrootkit:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chkrootkit

http://freecode.com/projects/chkrootkit

(not directly linking to official site url because it’s been up/down)

(the past few weeks)

 

+ Combofix:

http://www.combofix.org/

 

+ Cuckoo Sandbox:

http://www.cuckoosandbox.org/

 

+ Dan’s Guardian:

http://dansguardian.org/

 

+ DBAN (Darik’s Boot and Nuke):

http://www.dban.org/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/dban/

 

+ DDRescue:

https://www.gnu.org/software/ddrescue/ddrescue.html

 

+ debsecan:

http://www.enyo.de/fw/software/debsecan/

 

+ Deny Hosts:

http://denyhosts.sourceforge.net/

 

+ DNSCrypt

https://www.opendns.com/technology/dnscrypt/

https://blog.opendns.com/2012/02/16/tales-from-the-dnscrypt-linux-rising/

https://github.com/opendns/dnscrypt-proxy/blob/master/README.markdown

https://github.com/opendns/dnscrypt-proxy

 

+ DNSTop:

http://dns.measurement-factory.com/tools/dnstop/

 

+ EckBox:

http://eckbox.sourceforge.net

(offsite article): http://blockyourid.com/~gbpprorg/mil/eckbox/index.html

 

+ Enigmail – a security extension to Mozilla Thunderbird and Seamonkey:

http://www.enigmail.net/home/index.php

 

+ Enscribe:

http://www.coppercloudmusic.com/enscribe/

http://freecode.com/projects/enscribe

(old) http://web.archive.org/web/20060712151452/http://jbd.zayda.net/enscribe/

 

+ FakeAP

http://blackalchemy.to/project/fakeap/

 

+ Foremost:

http://foremost.sourceforge.net/

 

+ GNUPG (GPG):

http://www.gnupg.org/

http://www.gnupg.org/related_software/frontends.en.html

http://www.gnupg.org/related_software/gpa/index.en.html

http://utils.kde.org/projects/kgpg/

 

+ Honeypots (The Honeynet Project):

http://project.honeynet.org/tools/index.html

 

+ HTTPS Everywhere (Firefox and Chrome extension):

https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere

 

+ IPTraf:

http://iptraf.seul.org/

http://freecode.com/projects/iptraf

 

+ Jhead:

http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/jhead/

http://freecode.com/projects/jhead

 

+ John The Ripper:

http://www.openwall.com/john/

 

+ Linux Kernel Archives:

https://www.kernel.org/

 

+ Kismet:

https://kismetwireless.net/

http://freecode.com/projects/kismet

 

+ LaBrea:

http://labrea.sourceforge.net/

 

+ Liberté Linux (uses Tor):

http://dee.su/liberte

 

+ libemu (x86 Shellcode Emulation):

http://libemu.carnivore.it/

 

+ Lynis (Security and system auditing tool):

http://www.rootkit.nl/projects/lynis.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynis

http://freecode.com/projects/lynis

 

+ Mac Changer:

http://www.alobbs.com/macchanger

 

+ MAT – Metadata Anonymisation Toolkit:

https://mat.boum.org/

 

+ md5deep and hashdeep: (md5deep is a set of programs to compute MD5, SHA-1, SHA-256, Tiger, or Whirlpool message digests on an arbitrary number of files.)

(hashdeep is a program to compute, match, and audit hashsets.)

http://md5deep.sourceforge.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/md5deep/

 

+ MCrypt:

http://mcrypt.sourceforge.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/mcrypt/

 

+ Monkeysphere:

http://web.monkeysphere.info/

 

+ Nemesis:

http://nemesis.sourceforge.net/

 

+ Nessus:

http://www.nessus.org/

 

+ Network Monitoring Tools @ Stanford.edu:

http://www.slac.stanford.edu/xorg/nmtf/nmtf-tools.html

 

+ Ninite:

https://ninite.com/

 

+ NGrep:

http://ngrep.sourceforge.net/

 

+ NMap:

http://nmap.org/download.html

 

+ NoMachine NX:

http://nomachine.com/

 

+ NoScript (Firefox Extension)

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/noscript/

 

+ NTop:

http://www.ntop.org/

http://freecode.com/projects/ntop

 

+ OphCrack:

http://ophcrack.sourceforge.net/

 

+ OpenSSH:

http://www.openssh.com/

 

+ OpenSSL:

http://www.openssl.org/

 

+ Openwall:

http://www.openwall.com/

 

+ OSSEC:

http://www.ossec.net/

 

+ PhotoRec:

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec

 

+ Polipo (Proxy commonly associated with Tor and TAILS):

http://freecode.com/projects/polipo

 

+ Rootkits:

http://packetstormsecurity.org/UNIX/penetration/rootkits/

 

+ Rkhunter:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rkhunter

http://rkhunter.sourceforge.net/

(old) http://www.rootkit.nl/projects/rootkit_hunter.html

 

+ Scapy:

http://www.secdev.org/projects/scapy/

 

+ Seahorse:

http://projects.gnome.org/seahorse/

 

+ Secure-Delete:

http://freeworld.thc.org/releases/secure_delete-3.1.tar.gz

http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=secure+delete

 

+ Skipfish:

https://code.google.com/p/skipfish/

 

+ Sleuth Kit (TSK) & Autopsy:

http://www.sleuthkit.org/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/sleuthkit/

 

+ SNARE:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/snare/

 

+ Snort

http://www.snort.org/

 

+ socat:

http://www.dest-unreach.org/socat/

 

+ Sophos Linux/RST-B detection tool:

http://www.sophos.com/rst-detection-tool

 

+ srm – secure file deletion:

http://srm.sourceforge.net/

http://sourceforge.net/projects/srm/

http://freecode.com/projects/srm

 

+ SSDeep:

http://ssdeep.sourceforge.net/

 

+ SSHMenu:

http://sshmenu.sourceforge.net/

 

+ SSLStrip:

http://www.thoughtcrime.org/software/sslstrip/index.html

 

+ SSSS (Shamir’s Secret Sharing Scheme):

http://point-at-infinity.org/ssss/

 

+ Stegdetect:

http://www.outguess.org/detection.php

http://freecode.com/projects/stegdetect

 

+ Steghide:

http://steghide.sourceforge.net/

http://www.freecode.com/projects/steghide

 

+ Suricata:

http://www.openinfosecfoundation.org/

http://www.openinfosecfoundation.org/index.php/download-suricata

 

+ Switzerland (Network Testing Tool):

https://www.eff.org/pages/switzerland-network-testing-tool

 

+ System Rescue CD:

http://www.sysresccd.org/

 

+ Tails LiveCD (uses Tor):

https://tails.boum.org/

 

+ Tempest for Eliza

http://www.erikyyy.de/tempest/

 

+ Tiger – Unix security audit and intrusion detection tool:

http://nongnu.org/tiger/

 

+ Tiger – Cryptographic Hash Function:

http://www.cs.technion.ac.il/~biham/Reports/Tiger/

 

+ Tor:

http://metrics.torproject.org/

https://blog.torproject.org/blog/

https://bridges.torproject.org/

https://check.torproject.org/

https://lists.torproject.org/

https://weather.torproject.org/

https://www.torproject.org/

https://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en

https://www.torproject.org/docs/documentation.html.en

https://www.torproject.org/download/download-easy.html.en

https://www.torproject.org/press/press.html.en

https://www.torproject.org/projects/projects.html.en

https://www.torproject.org/torbutton/

https://www.torproject.org/vidalia/

 

+ Tor Chat2:

https://github.com/prof7bit/TorChat

https://github.com/prof7bit/TorChat/downloads

(old/original) https://code.google.com/p/torchat/

 

+ Tor Stats:

http://torstatus.blutmagie.de/

 

+ Tripwire:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Source_Tripwire

http://sourceforge.net/projects/tripwire/

 

+ TrueCrypt:

http://www.truecrypt.org/

http://www.truecrypt.org/docs/

http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads

http://www.truecrypt.org/news

http://forums.truecrypt.org/

 

+ VOIP Hopper:

http://voiphopper.sourceforge.net/

 

+ Volatility Framework

https://www.volatilesystems.com/default/volatility#overview

https://code.google.com/p/volatility/w/list

http://lists.volatilesystems.com/mailman/listinfo

 

+ WarVOX:

http://warvox.org/

 

+ Webmin:

http://www.webmin.com/

 

+ Whirlpool – a cryptographic hash function:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whirlpool_%28cryptography%29

http://www.larc.usp.br/~pbarreto/WhirlpoolPage.html

 

+ Wipe:

http://wipe.sourceforge.net/

 

+ Wireshark:

https://www.wireshark.org/

 

+ Yersinia:

http://www.yersinia.net/

 

+ Zfone

http://zfoneproject.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zfone

—————————————-

 

* 6009.3: Linux Various+

(most are not directly security related)

——————–

http://appdb.winehq.org/

http://blogs.valvesoftware.com/linux/steamd-penguins/

http://distrowatch.com/

http://frankscorner.org/

http://lbproject.sourceforge.net/

http://linuxgazette.net/

http://linux.slashdot.org/

http://linux.sys-con.com/

http://lxer.com/

http://olpcnews.com/

http://oreilly.com/linux/

http://osdir.com/

http://packetstormsecurity.org/

http://planet.debian.org/

http://planet.gentoo.org/

http://planet.ubuntu.com/

https://lwn.net/

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuWeeklyNewsletter/

https://www.kernel.org/

https://www.linux.com/

http://techrights.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

http://tllts.org/

http://ubuntupocketguide.com/index_main.html

http://wine-review.blogspot.com/

http://www.codeweavers.com/

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/

http://www.linuxformat.com/

http://www.linuxjournal.com/

http://www.linux-magazine.com/

http://www.linux-mag.com/

http://www.linux.org/

http://www.linuxpromagazine.com/

http://www.linuxsecurity.com/

http://www.linuxtag.org

http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/

http://www.mail-archive.com/funsec@linuxbox.org/

http://www.osnews.com/

http://www.playonlinux.com/en

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/linux-101-hacks-ebook/

http://www.tuxarena.com/

http://www.winehq.org/

http://www.wine-reviews.net/

(in limbo?) http://www.desktoplinux.com/news/

 

—————————————-

** 6010: Windows Security (that’s a joke) Tools:

 

+ Attack Surface Analyzer

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24487

 

+ Flame Removal Tool (32 & 64bit versions):

http://labs.bitdefender.com/2012/5/cyber-espionage-reaches-new-levels-with-flamer/

 

+ GNUPG (GPG):

http://www.gnupg.org/

http://www.gnupg.org/related_software/frontends.en.html

https://code.google.com/p/cryptophane/

 

+ MobaXterm:

http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/

http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/download-home-edition

http://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/download.html

 

+ PhotoRec:

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec

 

+ PuTTY:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PuTTY

 

+ SNARE:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/snare/

 

+ TDSSKiller Anti-Rootkit Tool:

http://support.kaspersky.com/faq/?qid=208283363

 

+ WinSCP:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WinSCP

 

+ Zfone

http://zfoneproject.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zfone

 

(Archive/Alive) https://www.techsupportalert.com/content/probably-best-free-security-list-world.htm

(Article, DOC) http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg487309

(Article) http://resources.infosecinstitute.com/tuluka/

(Article) https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/942.hyper-v-how-to-detect-if-a-computer-is-a-vm-using-script.aspx

(Article) http://technet.microsoft.com/library/gg176673.aspx?ITPID=sprblog

(Article) http://technet.microsoft.com/library/gg176676.aspx?ITPID=sprblog

(Article) http://www.symantec.com/connect/articles/alien-autopsy-reverse-engineering-win32-trojans-linux

(Article/Wiki) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_SSH_clients

(Discontinued Magazine / File downloads) http://www.magnesiummedia.com/pcutilities/

(doc, leads to ) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24373

(doc, leads to ) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=3118

(docx, leads to) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=20092

(Forum) https://www.microsoft.com/communities/forums/default.mspx

(Forum) http://www.sevenforums.com/

(Forum) http://www.w7forums.com/

(PDFs) http://www.nsa.gov/ia/mitigation_guidance/security_configuration_guides/operating_systems.shtml

(Spreadsheet xlsx, leads to) https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=19990

(Tutorial) Creating a Steady State by Using Microsoft Technologies / Windows 7 – Part 1/3

(Tutorial) Creating a Steady State by Using Microsoft Technologies / Windows 7 – Part 2/3

(Tutorial) Creating a Steady State by Using Microsoft Technologies / Windows 7 – Part 3/3

(Tutorial) mechBgon’s guide 1/3 http://www.mechbgon.com/build/router.html

(Tutorial) mechBgon’s guide 2/3 http://www.mechbgon.com/build/security1.html

(Tutorial) mechBgon’s guide 3/3 http://www.mechbgon.com/build/security2.html

——————————————————————————–

This is the end of HUGE Security Resource+ – version 6000 – 08/31/2012

——————————————————————————–

We post this publication first at PasteBin.com. Please stay tuned

for the next version of HUGE Security Resource+. It’s not the best

of names for a publication, but we’re lazy, and this is free for

you.

 

We do not name, credit, or otherwise pimp out who we are. None of us

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We’re not on Facebook, Twitter, or any other whore social media circles,

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Please share this document with others, convert it to PDF

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posted links to ensure they are alive and at the same location

and if not, we bring the links up to date. Some links are archives,

some lead directly to PDF files. Surely you’ve noticed as we’ve

made it quite simple to navigate this document with tagging

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A few of the blogs linked within this document haven’t been updated

in awhile, but they remain as a useful archive of information

generated in past entries, and some bloggers go several weeks,

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the chosen ones published here were selected on the basis

of quality.

 

We’d like to say thanks to CRYPTOME who has been linking

to our official release pages at PasteBin shortly after

we release a new version. Thanks Cryptome! And thank you

to PASTEBIN!

—————————————-

 

When this document began, in previous versions, it was previously

known as: HUGE List of Security Blogs: Unix, Linux, Windows,

part 1, 2, 3, and 4 and changed document names with version

5000. With version 6000 we renamed the project title from

‘HUGE Security Resource’ to ‘HUGE Security Resource+’,

meaning, with this version and future versions this document will

contain more than security related material.

(currently a work in progress)

 

PART   #  URL                            Release Date

—— –  —————————- – ————-

– part 1: http://pastebin.com/FwjBMJib – Dec 30th,2011

– part 2: http://pastebin.com/R9gpVemL – Jan 3rd, 2012

– part 3: http://pastebin.com/vgj3qKDW – Jan 3rd, 2012

– part 4: http://pastebin.com/F1JcZHLz – Jan 5th, 2012

– version 5000:

http://pastebin.com/M7ZwwVCA – Mar 6th, 2012

– version 6000:

– Aug 31th, 2012

—— –  —————————- – ————-

 

Thanks for reading!

 

If you enjoy this document please tell the admins of the

websites you visit from within this document where you

found them and provide them with a link to this

document.

=========================================================

Consideration #1: Are crossword puzzles and similar puzzles

published in print simply devices to alter the brain by

inserting carefully prepared words, phrases, and

numbers into your thought processes in order to trigger

or establish some type of action, or… connection.. to

something?

 

Consideration #2: What if all secret agencies were of one

accord spiritually, like in the paintings of dogs playing

poker, just using humanity to play out one big game of

destruction and domination with humans as the visible and

spiritual puppets?

=========================================================

09/24/12

Dark Heart botnet ToR-C2 BULLET proof server collector

gAtO fOuNd - this –// it’s crook selling to crooks take it at face value -/ but it does have some interesting ideas on what is out there in criminals hands and what is going on in the dark web. Now these are 10,000 yes 10k botnets can work in the clearWeb as well as Tor and i2p anonymized networks should cause some concern because normally we don’t monitor them.  Tor Domain-flux for both clearWeb and Tor – ( Tor Domain-flux- this is so easy to do but it’s a big feature) – VPN then Tor that will make this harder to find the botMaster. But the coolest feature is the i2p connection. Sorry boy’s and Ladies but Tor is getting old, i2p is beginning to glow and it’s a little different but very safe. It goes after (scanning)  WiFi and GPS tracking – So people sync your phone data to your computers data please…C&C and // one- BULLET proof server collector –

It not very hard to do this but – C&C and // one- BULLET proof server collector – is the sales pitch anyway I have obfuscated some links and names -find it your self – I know gAtO can build this so anyone can with some light reading – that comes out to .80 cents per bot for 10,000 bots -0ne c&c panel for $8,000 bucks – pretty cheap – oh yeah the readme comes in english too.

This modified Dark Heart bots and c&c in Tor ?12p ? 256-EAS encryption- We already have reports of it by different names but this was posted around Aug 7 2012.   Here is the –/ poor mans –Tor Domain-flux is so easy when you generate a hidden service it produces a key for your address in Tor onion land / just move the key to another directory and generate your new net key and so on and so on… Some of this is really well though out —/ but I don’t trust anyone and it’s so easy to build from scratch- gAtO oUt

—— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ————— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ————— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ———

Dark Heart botnet— NOT – for sale $8000

Run on windows clients – I need 3 C&C server IP addresses to hardcode and obfuscate

bot coded in assembly no dependencies

Each build has maximum of 10k bots to ovoid widespread av detection.

Basic bot uses socks5.

built in ssh client

(fast-flux)

Bot is built with 30k pre generated 256 bit AES keys.

1 256 bit AES key for logs

1 256 bit AES key ssh

1 256 bit AES key socks 5

hwid it selects a pre-generated key 256 bit AES key.

Bot writes encrypted data into common file using stenography process injection

Download/Upload Socks5

Bot sends data to a collector bot via socks5 through ipv6 which makes NAT traversal a trivial matter.

Using ipv6 in ipv4 tunnel.

Collector bot assembly /tor and i2p Plug-ins C++ /Assuming 10k bots

Bots will be assigned into small groups of 25. And are assigned 400 collectors bots which is evenly 200 tor and 200 i2p.

Collector packages the encrypted logs and imports them into a .zip or rar archive and uses sftp to upload through tor to a bullet proof server Note the Ukraine is best know.

(Domain-flux .onion panel can be easily moved)

Using a Ubuntu Server on bullet proof server.  / Using tor and Privoxy. Panel can be routed through multiple cracked computers using proxychains and ssh.  / Server uses a simple .onion panel with php5 and apache2 and mysql. You might ask what happens if bullet proof server is down. The collector bots can be loaded with 5 .onion panels. If panel fails for 24 hours its removed from all Collectors and bot will go to the next one and so forth. A python Daemon runs and unzip the data and Imports it into a mysql database were it remains encrypted.

The bot master uses my Dark Umbrella.net panel to connect to the remote Bullet Proof server through a vpn and then through tor using ssh to run remote commands on server and sftp to upload and download. Running tor through a log less vpn through with a trusted exit node on the tor network. .net panel connects to mysql database database is decrypted on .NET panel (Note must real Bullet Proof hosting is not trust worthy this solves that issue) and imported into a local .mdb database. Then later the bot Master should encrypt database folder on true crypt. Commands are sent to bots individually rather then corporately like most bot nets. This allows for greater anonymity It will be possible to send commands corporately but strongly discouraged. Collector bots download and upload large files through i2p.

1.Connects remotely to rpc daemon through backconect and simplifying metasploit (Working)

2.Social network cracker. (Beta)

3.Statics. (Working)

4.Anonymity status. (Working)

5.Decrypt-er. Decryption codes in highly obfuscated.net limiting each build to 10k bots. (Working)

6.Daemon status (Working)

7.logs (Working)

8.Metasploit connects via rpc. (working)

9. GPS tracked Assets by Google maps and using net-book with a high powered external usb wifi attenas.

Starts an automatic attack if wep if wpa2 grabes handshake. If open starts basic arp spoofing attack. Common browser exploits. (alpha)

10.Teensy spread. (in development)

11.vnc back connect. (working)

12. Advanced Persistent threat. Fake Firefox, Fake Internet Explorer, Fake Chrome. Fake Windows Security Essentials. (in development allows for excellent custom Bot-master defined keyloging)

13. Dark search bot index file is downloaded allowing easy searching of hard drives. (Working)

14. voip logic bomb. bot computer is sent via a voip call file once played through voip the microphone hears mp3 file and the dormant payload is activated in bot that is the logic bomb. (Extra- Alpha)

Each Panel is hwid

1 unique build per Copy embedded into panel.

Everything is provided in English only manuals for setup: you need 3 servers for C&C and // one- BULLET proof server collector for -/ everything is working and can be setup within hours: Only serious players –  for sale $8000 -bitcoin – (obfuscated )1A9nBLgdhf4NJadXiBppqqU96AhbMBQrgV -

—— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ————— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ————— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ————— – EDUCATIONAL – ONLY – ———